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Thread: Say it with a Stamp!

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    Re: Say it with a Stamp!



    Muscle cars! Any current or former muscle car owners here? I don't know enough about them to have any suggestions for some that should have been included or exempted from this list.

    The USPS says: "With the issuance of the Muscle Cars (Forever®) stamps, the U.S. Postal Service celebrates five iconic automobiles: the 1966 Pontiac GTO, the 1967 Shelby GT-500, the 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona, the 1970 Plymouth Hemi 'Cuda, and the 1970 Chevelle SS. Each of these cars represents the adventurous spirit of the muscle-car era. Fast, powerful, and eye-catching, muscle cars roared their way onto America's roads in the 1960s. Typically equipped with big, powerful engines, the five high-performance vehicles depicted on the stamps represent the era's adventurous spirit.

    1969 Dodge Charger Daytona
    Designed to dominate the racetrack, the outrageously styled 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona was powered by a standard 440-cubic-inch, 375-horsepower Magnum engine. A limited number of Daytonas came equipped with a 426-cubic-inch Hemi, a race-inspired engine. The car also featured multiple additions designed to boost aerodynamics, including a nearly two-foot tall, rear-mounted wing. Other signature touches included thick body stripes containing the word “DAYTONA.” The 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona was distinctive and rare; only 503 were produced.

    1966 Pontiac GTO
    Available as a hardtop, coupe, or convertible, the GTO—which was propelled by a 335-horsepower, V8 engine—could really move. “The Goat,” as the GTO was known, ushered in the American muscle-car era in the mid-1960s. In tests, it went from 0 to 60 miles per hour in 6.8 seconds. The distinctive car featured curvy Coke-bottle styling and a split grille. Initially offered simply as an option on the Tempest LeMans, the GTO became its own model in 1966. That model year, sales of the GTO peaked.

    1967 Shelby GT-500
    Manufacturer and former racecar driver Carroll Shelby's version of the Ford Mustang was powered by a 428-cubic-inch, 355-horsepower Police Interceptor engine. The car also featured a rear spoiler and dealer-installed LeMans stripes as an option. The Shelby GT-500 was both striking and rare; only 2,048 were built. A customized or original version of the 1967 Shelby GT-500 has appeared in contemporary movies and magazines, rekindling American pop culture's fascination with the model.

    1970 Chevelle SS
    With features like optional twin racing stripes and a black grille, the Chevelle SS looked fierce. The car featured a 396-cubic-inch engine, but an optional 454-cubic-inch engine really gave the model credibility among muscle car enthusiasts. Two versions of the 454 engine were available: the 360-horsepower LS-5 and the 450-horsepower LS-6. For its power, the latter has become legendary among car buffs. Available as a coupe or a convertible, the Chevelle SS featured emblems on the grille and the rear bumper.

    1970 Plymouth Hemi 'Cuda
    The Hemi 'Cuda, the performance-oriented alter-ego of the standard 1970 Plymouth Barracuda, oozed power. The car's 426-cubic-inch Hemi engine was a 425-horsepower beast. The Hemi 'Cuda was “our angriest, slipperiest-looking body shell wrapped around ol' King Kong hisself,” one Plymouth advertisement bellowed. The Hemi 'Cuda's styling was an extension of the car's bold ethos. It was available in several eye-popping color choices, such as Lemon Twist, Lime Light, and Vitamin C. Fewer than 700 Hemi 'Cudas were produced.

    Artist Tom Fritz based his artwork on photographs of the cars. Fritz said he used bright-colored oil paints on hardboard to try to “capture the emotive quality of the vehicles.” Growing up in Southern California, Fritz became familiar with the power of muscle cars. The paintings, Fritz added, are “a projection of my memories of the vehicles.”

    Muscle Cars is the third issuance in the America on the Move series. The stamps were designed by art director Carl T. Herrman. The first issuance in the series, 50s Sporty Cars (2005), was followed by 50s Fins and Chrome (2008)."

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    Re: Say it with a Stamp!



    Modern Art in America 1913-1931

    The USPS says:
    "the U.S. Postal Service commemorates a dozen modern artists and their works, 100 years after the groundbreaking Armory Show opened in New York in 1913. The dozen masterpieces reproduced in the stamp art were created between 1912 and 1931.

    Stuart Davis's vibrant depictions of contemporary commercial objects made him an important precursor of the later Pop artists. His oil-on-canvas painting, House and Street (1931), presents two views of a street in New York, forcing the viewer to be in two places at once.

    Charles Demuth, a leading watercolorist of his era, created his “poster portraits” of friends such as the poet William Carlos Williams, the subject of the work I Saw the Figure 5 in Gold (1928), in oil, graphite, ink, and gold leaf on paperboard.

    Aaron Douglas was the most important visual artist to emerge from the Harlem Renaissance. The gouache-on-paper painting, The Prodigal Son (1927), was created in a modernist style that has been described as “Afro-Cubism.”

    Arthur Dove was one of modern art's earliest abstract painters and was probably the first American artist to paint a totally abstract canvas. Dove was interested in attempting to duplicate sound as colors and shapes. The oil-on-canvas painting, Fog Horns (1929), suggests the peal of foghorns at sea.

    Marcel Duchamp, an important forerunner of the Pop art and conceptual art movements, outraged and disturbed many viewers by irreverently flouting artistic convention. His oil-on-canvas painting, Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2 (1912), was the most talked-about work at the Armory Show of 1913.

    Marsden Hartley was one of America's greatest modernist painters. His oil-on-canvas work, Painting, Number 5 (1914-15), is an abstract composite portrait of Karl von Freyburg, a young German officer who was killed in World War I.

    John Marin was the preeminent watercolorist of his era. He transformed the medium by experimenting with abstraction, such as in his watercolor-on-paper painting, Sunset, Maine Coast (1919).

    Gerald Murphy produced only about a dozen works in less than ten years as a practicing artist, yet today he is recognized as a significant painter whose work prefigured the Pop art of the 1960s. The oil-on-canvas painting, Razor (1924), typifies Murphy's work in its detailed depiction of commonplace objects.

    Georgia O'Keeffe was one of the foremost painters of the 20th century. Widely known for her close-up flower paintings, O'Keeffe also famously painted urban and desert landscapes, including this oil-on-canvas painting, Black Mesa Landscape, New Mexico / Out Back of Marie's II (1930).

    Man Ray was associated with some of the most important artistic movements of the 20th century—chief among them Dadaism and Surrealism—and is best known for his photography. His gelatin-silver print, Noire et Blanche (1926), is from a series of photographs juxtaposing a woman's face with a Baule mask (or a replica) from West Africa.

    Charles Sheeler explored the balance between abstraction and realism in his photographs and paintings, which often depicted aspects of the mechanized modern world. By titling this oil-on-canvas painting American Landscape (1930), Sheeler explored the relationship between rural traditions and his modern subject matter.

    Joseph Stella, America's first Futurist painter, is remembered for his multiple images of the Brooklyn Bridge and other iconic New York scenes. The oil-on-canvas painting, Brooklyn Bridge (1919-1920) has been read as a comment on the tension between technological achievement and the spiritual dimension implicit in any human endeavor.

    The stamp sheet also includes a quote by Marcel Duchamp and verso text that identifies each work of art and briefly tells something about each artist. Art director Derry Noyes worked on the stamp sheet with designer Margaret Bauer."

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    Re: Say it with a Stamp!



    Patriotic Star

    The USPS says:
    "With this illustration of a red, white, and blue striped Patriotic Star, the U.S. Postal Service celebrates American patriotism. The star is one of the nation's quintessential symbols, a shining reminder of our indomitable spirit. “When I go out of doors in the summer night, and see how high the stars are,” wrote 19th-century philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson, “I am persuaded that there is time enough, here or somewhere, for all that I must do.”

    The 2013 Patriotic Star, which is designed to look like it is crafted from striped ribbon, is the latest issuance featuring a star. The Patriotic Star stamp features a red, white, and blue five-pointed star on a white background. The star on the stamp is actually two stars — a smaller one inside a larger one. Both have five points, like the stars on the American flag.

    Created digitally by artist Nancy Stahl, the star is designed to look like it is crafted from striped ribbon. Greg Breeding served as the art director on the project."

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    Re: Say it with a Stamp!



    La Florida

    The USPS says:
    "The U.S. Postal Service commemorates the 500th anniversary of the naming of Florida with the release of the La Florida (Forever®) stamps that celebrate the state's floral abundance. During the Easter season of 1513, Spanish explorers first visited the state we now know as Florida. They named the land “La Florida” for Pascua Florida (“Feast of the Flowers”), Spain's Easter celebration, and for the verdant display of vegetation that they could see from their ship.

    The four se tenant stamps contain a cascade of blossoms that evokes the feeling of a tropical garden. Each stamp shows a particular variety of flower: red and pink hibiscus; yellow cannas; morning glories in white, red, and shades of purple; and white and purple passionflowers. The stamp pane includes on the selvage an imagined scene of explorers traveling in a small boat along a river or channel surrounded by tropical foliage.

    Flowers are a perennial favorite with collectors and the stamp-buying public, and La Florida's exquisite blossoms will be an elegant addition to the U.S. Postal Service's tradition of producing appealing and beautiful floral stamp art.

    Art director Ethel Kessler designed the stamp, with floral art by Steve Buchanan."

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    Re: Say it with a Stamp!



    Vintage Seed Packets

    The USPS says:
    "Flowers are among the most popular subjects on stamps, and the U.S. Postal Service continues its tradition of beautiful issuances with Vintage Seed Packets (Forever®).

    From hand-tinted lithographs in the early 1800s to modern photography, images of floral perfection have adorned the covers of flower seed packets for more than a hundred years. The stamp art features ten photographs of antique seed packets (printed between 1910 to 1920), cropped to highlight their beautiful floral detail.

    Each of the ten stamps depicts the colorful blossoms of one kind of flower-cosmos, digitalis, pinks, primrose, calendula, aster, linum, alyssum, phlox, and zinnia. Above each illustration is the name of the flower in bold capital letters.

    Art director Antonio Alcalé designed the stamp booklet."

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    Re: Say it with a Stamp!



    Where Dreams Blossom

    The USPS says:
    "As universal symbols of love and happiness, flowers are often the centerpiece of our most sacred ceremonies and cheerful occasions. With a splash of color and a beautiful bouquet, the Where Dreams Blossom (Forever®) stamp adds a fun and contemporary flair to all kinds of correspondence.

    With a stylized bouquet of flowers similar to the design of the 2013 two-ounce Yes, I Do wedding stamp, Where Dreams Blossom (Forever®) is perfect for any occasion or use, including save-the-date notices, response cards, and thank-you notes. It can also be used for cards and letters sent to celebrate other joyous moments and to deliver comfort and encouragement. As an unknown author observed, “Hopes are planted in friendship's garden where dreams blossom into priceless treasures.”

    The stamp artwork was designed by Michael Osborne under the direction of Ethel Kessler."

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    Re: Say it with a Stamp!



    A Flag for All Seasons

    The USPS says:
    "From the heights of sunny summer to the snowy depths of winter, Old Glory proudly waves—thanks to laws and traditions that encourage respect for our vital national symbol. Guidelines for the display and treatment of the American flag hark back to the National Flag Code adopted in 1923 at the National Flag Conference and amended a year later. A federal law in 1942 further provided specific rules for using and displaying the flag.

    Each of these four A Flag For All Seasons (Forever®) stamps shows an American flag, viewed from below, flying from a pole at full staff against a background of trees that evoke one of the four seasons of the year.

    Federal law states that the American flag should be displayed every day of the year, but especially on federal and state holidays, the “birthdays” of states, and other days according to presidential proclamation. As long as a flag is a durable, all-weather flag, it may be displayed outdoors throughout the year, regardless of the weather.

    The stamp art, gouache on illustration board, is the work of Laura Stutzman, who used her personal photographs of the flag as art reference. The art director was Phil Jordan."

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    Re: Say it with a Stamp!



    Lydia Mendoza

    The USPS says:
    "The U.S. Postal Service Lydia Mendoza (Forever®) stamp honors the life of one of the first and greatest stars of Tejano music. Lydia Mendoza (1916-2007) is seen strumming her 12-string guitar on this lively stamp, one of several that inaugurates the Music Icons series.

    This square stamp captures the look of a vintage 45 rpm record sleeve, down to a slight weathering away of the colors. The stamp art features a black-and-white publicity photo of Mendoza taken in the 1950s. The flag of Texas, Mendoza's home state, is splashed across the photo, its vertical blue bar and horizontal red stripe providing the stamp's only color.

    Nicknamed La Alondra de la Frontera, the Lark of the Border, Lydia Mendoza performed the Spanish-language music of the Texas-Mexico borderlands and beyond. She is best known for her solo performances, her soulful voice accompanied only by the playing of her 12-string guitar. Mendoza recorded more than a thousand songs in a career that spanned seven decades. Through her music, she gave a voice not only to the poor and working-class people of the border, but also to Latinos throughout the Western Hemisphere.

    Born into a musical family, Mendoza first performed with her mother, father, and sister in stores and restaurants. After winning a singing contest on the radio, she recorded several solo cuts for Bluebird Records in 1934, including “Mal Hombre” or “Evil Man,” which went on to become her biggest hit.

    Neal Ashby and Patrick Donohue designed the stamp, working with art director Antonio Alcalá."

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    Re: Say it with a Stamp!



    The Civil War: 1863

    The USPS says:
    "The Civil War (1861-1865), the most profound conflict in American history, claimed the lives of more than 620,000 soldiers and brought vast changes to the country. In 2013, the Postal Service continues its commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the war by issuing this souvenir sheet of The Civil War: 1863 (Forever®) stamps featuring two stamp designs.

    One stamp depicts the Battle of Gettysburg, the largest battle of the war, while the other depicts the Battle of Vicksburg, a complex Union campaign to gain control of the Mississippi River.

    Art director Phil Jordan created the stamps using iconic images of the battles. The Battle of Gettysburg stamp is a reproduction of an 1887 chromolithograph by Thure de Thulstrup (1848-1930), a Swedish-born artist who became an illustrator for Harper's Weekly after the Civil War. Thulstrup's work was one of a series of popular prints commissioned in the 1880s by Boston publisher Louis Prang & Co. to commemorate the Civil War.

    The Battle of Vicksburg stamp is a reproduction of an 1863 lithograph by Currier & Ives titled “Admiral Porter's Fleet Running the Rebel Blockade of the Mississippi at Vicksburg, April 16th, 1863.”

    The background image on the souvenir sheet is a photograph taken by Mathew Brady shortly after the Battle of Gettysburg of captured Confederate soldiers, who reportedly posed for Brady on Seminary Ridge.

    The souvenir sheet includes comments on the war by Abraham Lincoln, Clara Barton, Rufus R. Dawes (a Union soldier), and William Tunnard (a Confederate soldier). It also includes some of the lyrics of “Lorena,” a popular Civil War song by Henry D. L. Webster and Joseph P. Webster."

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    Re: Say it with a Stamp!

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    Johnny Cash

    The USPS says:
    "Johnny Cash (1932-2003) is best remembered internationally as a country music artist, but we feel his influence just about everywhere—from rock and folk to blues and gospel. The Johnny Cash (Forever®) stamp is being issued this year as part of the exciting new Music Icons stamp series.

    Resembling the appearance of a 45 rpm record sleeve, the square stamp features a photograph taken by Frank Bez during the photo session for Ring of Fire: The Best of Johnny Cash (1963). In the photo, Cash stares out at the viewer through a veil of shadow, his brooding expression fitting for an artist known to so many people simply as “the Man in Black.”

    Cash found inspiration for his music in the stories of outlaws and laborers, and in his own life experience. A child of the Depression, he grew up in rural Arkansas, and the culture of that time and place—especially the Bible and gospel and country music—remained with him all his life. Themes of redemption, loneliness, love, loss, and death colored his music with a gritty realism that differed markedly from other socially conscious popular music. “I shot a man in Reno just to watch him die,” he sings famously in “Folsom Prison Blues.”

    By the 1960s, Cash had become one of the top names in country music, with a string of hits that included “Cry, Cry, Cry,” “I Walk the Line,” and the Grammy award-winning “A Boy Named Sue.” Though his popularity waned in the 1970s and 1980s, Cash made a remarkable resurgence in the 1990s, culminating in several more Grammy awards. He was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1980 and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992.

    Greg Breeding served as art director and designer for the stamp."

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