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    Burning tongue syndrome

    Anyone ever heard of such a thing? The tongue feels as if its been scalded, sore spots or areas in the mouth, throat yet, the mouth looks perfectly normal? Feelings of dryness or sticky-dryness at the corners of the mouth with repeated bacterial infections (pneumonia, plugged ear ducts, bronchitis) of the respiratory system including the sinus and ears?

    Postmenopausal female? Bariatric surgery patient? Male in the early forties? Afraid of oral cancer?
    Taking Blood pressure medication? Smoke? Drink? These strip your system of vital nutrients.
    It is treatable. See your doctor.
    B-12 (shots in some cases) , Iron, Zinc and in some cases calcium supplements are used to treat it.

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    Re: Burning tongue syndrome

    Just lay off the jalapenos..

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    Re: Burning tongue syndrome

    What is Burning Tongue Syndrome?
    Burning mouth syndrome is a relatively common condition which is characterized by a complaint of an abnormal sensation of the lining of the mouth which most patients describe as feeling like their mouth has been scalded. Usually this sensation develops in the front part of the mouth, typically affecting the inner surfaces of the lips, the roof of the mouth, and the sides and tip of the tongue. In some patients, only the tongue will be affected, however, any combination of these sites may be seen. Some patients may have decreased taste ability or altered taste sensation. In all cases, however, the lining of the mouth clinically appears normal.

    Who gets burning mouth?
    Most patients who develop burning mouth syndrome are post menopausal women. We usually see about ten women for every man that has burning mouth syndrome. Interestingly, men develop this condition, on the average, about fifteen years earlier than women. This does seem to be a relatively common problem which is seen all over the world. For example, in Holland, patients with burning mouth syndrome have formed a suppport group. This seems to be a condition which affects people of all races and all socioeconomic backgrounds.

    What causes burning mouth?
    Nobody knows. There are a few uncommon diseases which should be tested for, such as anemia, diabetes and oral yeast infections. For most patients with burning mouth syndrome, however, those tests turn out to be normal. Some investigators have suggested that burning mouth may be a problem related to the nerves in the mouth or that it may be caused by a reduced amount of blood flowing to the mouth, however, no one has proven those theories. We do know that burning mouth is not related to anything serious, such as cancer or AIDS. Furthermore, it is not contagious-it can't be passed from one person to another.

    How do doctor's diagnose burning mouth syndrome?
    Burning mouth syndrome is diagnosed by doing blood tests and blood cultures to make certain that one of the other problems mentioned previously is not present. If those tests are all negative, and if the lining of the mouth appears normal, then we can make a diagnosis of burning mouth syndrome.

    How is burning mouth syndrome treated?
    Unfortunately, no one has developed a medically proven treatment for burning mouth syndrome. I suppose the main problem is that we don't know what causes burning mouth syndrome, therefore it is difficult to develop a treatment for the problem. A variety of medications, such as female hormone replacement therapy and vitamin therapy, have been tried, however, such treatments either have no effect or their effect is no greater than what we would expect to see with placebo treatment.

    How long will the burning sensation last?
    Again, we cannot say for sure. We do know that with some patients, the condition will resolve after a period of time, but no one can predict how long that will be. For the most part, this problem is a nuisance, and it is a frustrating situation for both patients and doctors.

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    Re: Burning tongue syndrome

    Thanks Chezzie. This one seems to be more informative though, and since I had bariatic sugery which can result in malabsorbtion of iron, b vitamins, zinc and calcium this is most likely the cause of my problem:http://http://www.mayoclinic.com/hea...ndrome/DS00462Introduction
    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a complex, vexing condition in which a burning pain occurs that may involve your tongue, lips or widespread areas of your whole mouth, without any obvious reason.

    The disorder has long been associated with a variety of other conditions — including menopause, psychological problems, nutritional deficiencies and disorders of the mouth, such as oral thrush and dry mouth (xerostomia). Some researchers have suggested dysfunctional or damaged nerves as a possible cause. But the exact cause of burning mouth syndrome is often difficult to pin down, and pain may continue for months or years.

    Treatment of burning mouth syndrome is highly individualized and depends on your particular signs and symptoms and on the underlying cause or causes, if they can be identified. Most people with burning mouth syndrome can control their symptoms through tailored treatment plans.

    Other names sometimes used for burning mouth syndrome include scalded mouth syndrome, burning tongue syndrome, burning lips syndrome, glossodynia and stomatodynia.

    and symptoms

    CLICK TO ENLARGE
    Burning mouth syndrome
    The main symptom of burning mouth syndrome is a burning sensation involving your tongue, lips, gums, palate, throat or widespread areas of your whole mouth. People with the syndrome may describe the sensation in the affected areas as hot or scalded, as if they had been burned with a hot liquid.

    Other symptoms may include:

    Dry mouth
    Sore mouth
    A tingling or numb sensation in your mouth or on the tip of your tongue
    A bitter or metallic taste

    Some people with burning mouth syndrome don't wake up with mouth pain, but find that the pain intensifies during the day and into the evening. Some have constant daily pain, while others feel pain on and off throughout the day and may even have periods in which they feel no pain at all.

    Burning mouth syndrome affects women seven times as often as men. It generally occurs in middle-aged or older adults. But it may occur in younger people as well.
    Causes
    The possible causes of burning mouth syndrome are many and complex. Each of the following possible causes applies to only a portion of all people who complain of a burning mouth. Many people have multiple causes. Identifying all of the causes is important so that your doctor can develop a treatment plan tailored for you. Possible causes include:

    Dry mouth (xerostomia). This condition can be related to use of certain medications, including tricyclic antidepressants, central nervous system depressants, lithium, diuretics and medications used to treat high blood pressure. It can also occur with aging or Sjogren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease that causes both dry mouth and dry eyes.
    Other oral conditions. Oral yeast infection (thrush) is a common cause of a burning mouth that may also occur with other causes, such as diabetes, denture use and certain medications. Geographic tongue, a condition that causes a dry mouth and a sore, patchy tongue, also may be associated with burning mouth syndrome.
    Psychological factors. Emotional disorders, such as anxiety and depression, are often associated with burning mouth syndrome, as is an extreme fear of cancer. Although these problems can cause a burning mouth, they may also result from it.
    Nutritional deficiencies. Being deficient in nutrients, such as iron, zinc, folate (vitamin B-9), thiamin (vitamin B-1), riboflavin (vitamin B-2), pyridoxine (vitamin B-6) and cobalamin (vitamin B-12), may affect your oral tissues and cause a burning mouth. These deficiencies can also lead to vitamin deficiency anemia.
    Irritating dentures. Dentures may place stress on some of the muscles and tissues of your mouth. The materials used in dentures also may irritate the tissues in your mouth.
    Nerve disturbance or damage (neuropathy). Damage to nerves that control taste and pain in the tongue may also result in a burning mouth.
    Allergies. The mouth burning may be due to allergies or reactions to foods, food flavorings, other food additives, fragrances, dyes or other substances.
    Reflux of stomach acid (gastroesophageal reflux disease). The sour- or bitter-tasting fluid that enters your mouth from your upper gastrointestinal tract may cause irritation and pain.
    Certain medications. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, used to treat high blood pressure, may cause side effects that include a burning mouth.
    Oral habits. These include often-unconscious activities, such as tongue thrusting and teeth grinding (bruxism), which can irritate your mouth.
    Endocrine disorders. Your oral tissues may react to high blood sugar levels that occur with conditions such as diabetes and underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism).
    Hormonal imbalances, such as those associated with menopause. Burning mouth syndrome occurs most commonly among postmenopausal women, although it affects many other people as well. Changes in hormone levels may affect the composition of your saliva.
    Excessive irritation. Irritation of the oral tissues may result from excessive brushing of your tongue, overuse of mouthwashes or consuming too many acidic drinks.
    Often, more than one cause is present. Despite careful evaluation, doctors are sometimes unable to find the cause of burning mouth symptoms.

    Treatment
    Treatment triggers improvement in symptoms for most people with burning mouth syndrome. But the type of treatment depends on the underlying cause.

    Dry mouth (xerostomia). Treating the cause of your dry mouth — Sjogren's syndrome, use of medications or some other cause — may relieve burning mouth symptoms. In addition, drinking more fluids or taking a medication that promotes flow of saliva may help.
    Other oral conditions. If the cause is oral thrush, treatment is with oral antifungal medications such as nystatin (Mycostatin) or fluconazole (Diflucan). If you wear dentures, your dentures may also need to be treated.
    Psychological factors. For a burning mouth that may be caused by or associated with psychological factors such as anxiety and depression, your doctor may recommend antidepressant therapy or psychiatric therapy or both together. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (Prozac, Zoloft, others) may cause less dry mouth than other antidepressant medications.
    Nutritional deficiencies. You may be able to correct nutritional deficiencies by taking supplements of B vitamins and minerals such as zinc and iron. SINCE I STARTED TAKING B12, IRON AND ZINC SUPLIMENTS ITS GOTTEN BETTER.Irritating dentures. Your dentist may be able to adjust your dentures so they are less irritating to your mouth. If your dentures contain substances that irritate your oral tissues, you may need different dentures. You may also improve symptoms by practicing good denture care, such as removing dentures at night and cleaning them properly.
    Nerve disturbance or damage (neuropathy). Your doctor may suggest medications that affect your nervous system and control pain, including benzodiazepines such as clonazepam (Klonopin), tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline or nortriptyline (Pamelor, Aventyl), or anticonvulsants such as gabapentin (Neurontin). For pain relief, your doctor may also suggest rinsing your mouth with water and capsaicin — the active ingredient in hot peppers, which also is called capsicum.
    Allergies. Avoiding foods that contain allergens that may irritate the tissues of your mouth may help.
    Certain medications. If a medication you're taking is causing a burning mouth, using a substitute medication, if possible, may help.
    Oral habits. Tongue thrusting and teeth grinding (bruxism) can be helped with mouth guards, medications and relaxation techniques.
    Endocrine disorders. If a burning mouth is associated with conditions such as diabetes or hypothyroidism, treating those conditions may improve your symptoms.
    If doctors can't identify the cause of your symptoms, they may still recommend trying oral thrush medications, B vitamins or antidepressants. These medications have proved effective in treating burning mouth syndrome.

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    Re: Burning tongue syndrome

    I have had BMS for 18 months and have finally found a cure from an oral specialist. Clonazepam 0.5mg chewed and swirled in mouth and then spat out 3 times a day. It has changed my life!!!

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    Re: Burning tongue syndrome

    I had it for nearly 3 years. It occurred after oral surgery. It was excruciatingly painful, mostly in the evening. My only relief was neurontin. I could of cut my tongue off. I saw many physicians with no relief or answers. I finally went on line and ask my MD for neurontin. Everyone treated me like it was psychogenic. I can tell you it wasn't this was completely physiological. I still have tingling but no burning after nearly 10 years. It only noticeable in the evening. I was able to wean off the neurontin. I would not wish this upon my worst enemy. I don't believe the medical profession takes this seriously or understand the pain. I am still fearful that it will return.

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    Re: Burning tongue syndrome

    How long were you taking it for before you came off it? Did you notice any withdrawal symptoms?
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    Re: Burning tongue syndrome

    Once I started neurontin, my symptoms improved within a week. They were not 100% better but I was in a lot less pain. I stayed on the medicine for 2 1/2 years and weaned myself off once I noticed the painful symptoms were nearly gone. I still have the tingling but I can live with that. It took about 2 to 3 weeks of weaning. I had no side effects from the weaning.

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    Re: Burning tongue syndrome

    About 6 months ago I started noticing a burning sensation at the tip of my tongue, then
    about 4 months ago I started feeling like I had to keep biting the inside of my cheeks
    after that I started to get stickey saliva. This really is a nuicense. I keep feeling like I
    have to swallow this stickey guey stuff in my mouth. Went to dentist, he did not know.
    Went to GI dr. and MD both did not know. GI dr. said it was from taking maganesium supplements.
    Does any one really know what to do about it. My mouth is fine, no sores etc.

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    Re: Burning tongue syndrome

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    I take magnesium supplements and I've never had this. Maybe try an Ear/Nose/Throat specialist?

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