Make these ads go away.
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 13 of 13

Thread: A ?Legal? Problem

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    is .
     
    I am:
    Happy
     
    Bryn Mawr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    15,316
    Local Date
    09-24-2018
    Local Time
    03:05 PM
    Points
    23,248
    Gifts Balloons Car Gift Naughty Mag Certificate Beer Beer

    Re: A ?Legal? Problem

    Ha! It turns out that the legal profession have been there before me and, having seen the problem before, have invented an expression just to cover it.

    Of course, being the legal profession, it has to be in latin - per stirpes.

    Not a phrase that trips off the tongue but useful nontheless.

  2. #12
    gmc
    Currently Offline
    Senior Member
    This user has no status.
     
    I am:
    ----
     

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    13,267
    Local Date
    09-24-2018
    Local Time
    03:05 PM
    Points
    28,372
    Gifts Cocktail Car Beer

    Re: A ?Legal? Problem

    Quote Originally Posted by Bryn Mawr View Post
    I find myself in a position where I need to write a new will - the last one is thirty years old and no longer fully appropriate.

    Herein lies the problem, I can easily write a program that expresses exactly what I want (and, indeed, I have it on the screen in front of me). What I can't do is to write it down in a way that satisfies me that it's unambiguous and legally binding.

    Do you think that the probate office would accept the code?
    They might not and you will need to get lawyers involved at that point anyway so why not get one to write it - the cost is minimal anyway and make sure it's done properly. It's also open to being challenged there are certain catagories you can't write out of your will such as children and wives. You also need to decide who will be your executors and whoi will succeed them if you npredecease them

    Life insurance policies can be written in trust by the companies concerned who will provide the forms and loidge it for you . Good idea keeps them out of your estate and payout is immediate, will trust are only necessary iof you are planning to avoid inheritamnce task

    I can never understand why people don't just ask a lawyer in the first place, the good ones will talk to you without billing you, and prefer to trust sources that might not actually know what they are talking about. Not usimng a lawyer is a damn sight more expensive than using one right from the beginninmg.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    is .
     
    I am:
    Happy
     
    Bryn Mawr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    15,316
    Local Date
    09-24-2018
    Local Time
    03:05 PM
    Points
    23,248
    Gifts Balloons Car Gift Naughty Mag Certificate Beer Beer

    Re: A ?Legal? Problem

    Register to remove this ad.
    Quote Originally Posted by gmc View Post
    They might not and you will need to get lawyers involved at that point anyway so why not get one to write it - the cost is minimal anyway and make sure it's done properly. It's also open to being challenged there are certain catagories you can't write out of your will such as children and wives. You also need to decide who will be your executors and whoi will succeed them if you npredecease them

    Life insurance policies can be written in trust by the companies concerned who will provide the forms and loidge it for you . Good idea keeps them out of your estate and payout is immediate, will trust are only necessary iof you are planning to avoid inheritamnce task

    I can never understand why people don't just ask a lawyer in the first place, the good ones will talk to you without billing you, and prefer to trust sources that might not actually know what they are talking about. Not usimng a lawyer is a damn sight more expensive than using one right from the beginninmg.
    Your right and we will go to a solicitor in the final instance but I do like to know what I'm asking for and what to expect the result to be.

    In this case it's complicated by having foreign property to consider and fitting in with Greek law etc.

    Will trusts do have other uses than avoiding inheritance tax - they can also be set up to ensure that your half of the estate goes to your children rather than the children of a second wife or to a care home for example.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.5.2