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Thread: Dogs are much smarter than cats

  1. #11
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    Re: Dogs are much smarter than cats

    Quote Originally Posted by Clodhopper View Post
    As a result of helping a friend I now have a moaning spoilt rotten but basically decent lapdog (and 2 cats) in my house.

    There goes the nature reserve I'd made my garden into

    I was brought up with dogs but am long out of practice (no dog I want would I have in London) but I'm stuck with this one. I have established I'm top dog through whacking him if he attacks me. I think things are improving but any tips gratefully received.
    Sounds like it may be puppy playbiting behaviour that was never curbed. The one and only time I have hit my dog was when he drew blood with those razor sharp puppy teeth that they have - I still have scars on my hand. Whacking doesn't really work put him on his side and pin him down till he calms down. I've seen people use that on alsatians with good effect ( I knew someone that ran an alsatian rescue centre)
    then show him the behaviour you want. It's no good just shouting or hitting a misbehaving dog show him what you want. If he wants your attention make him sit and wait before you interact. My dogs still jump up when excited but remember and then sit, just dont ignore them when they behave the way you want heap praise otherwise you can almost see them deciding not to bother. I see people doing that all the time the dog does something right and the owner fails to reinforce the behaviour. Ignore the behaviour you want to change and make a fuss when they do what you want.

    Put yourself in the dog's position, he wants to do whatever it is you want him to do now all you have to do is work out how to communicate what it is you want.

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    Re: Dogs are much smarter than cats

    A crow will teach itself to fashion tools in order to find food. The way I see things, this makes the crow far more intelligent that either a dog or a cat.

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    Re: Dogs are much smarter than cats

    Thanks. That's just what I needed. He really has had no training or discipline worth the name. Classic baby substitute. He's now 6 I believe.

    Another bout of dreadful behaviour last night. I think with hindsight he was claiming the chicken that was up on the side as his and was trying to keep everyone else away from it. I have been telling him he's a good dog and fussing over him a bit when he's good for a while, but will do more. When his mistress isn't around he isn't so bad - no confidence or something. He's hates being without a human very close by. But as soon as she's around he turns into a demanding little horror.

    I don't think this is puppy play biting. When I was young our second Newfoundland was 6 months old when we got him and a bit wild. He was prone to play biting at first. I don't remember it being accompanied by serious growling and snarling. This is, plus darts at your ankles which is when he gets whacked. It does keep him off my ankles but I've realised that it has a limited effect. Pinning sounds much better. We'll see how it goes

    All sorts of weird habits: Wants to sit on your feet or as close as possible but then if you move your feet every now and then he'll go berserk and attack them. Not every time and as yet I've not worked out the exact trigger. It's not as simple as touching him with your foot.

    Doesn't like you waving your hands around when you talk.

    Tries to hump the cats. Even the neutered Tom, who beats him up for it. Way too much testosterone. At present I'm thinking castration may be the only real solution (his mistress has mentioned this though I'm not sure how serious she was) but hopefully we can get matters under control without that.

    You know, one funny thing about the situation: his name is Oscar...
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    Re: Dogs are much smarter than cats

    posted by clodhopper
    I don't think this is puppy play biting. When I was young our second Newfoundland was 6 months old when we got him and a bit wild. He was prone to play biting at first. I don't remember it being accompanied by serious growling and snarling. This is, plus darts at your ankles which is when he gets whacked. It does keep him off my ankles but I've realised that it has a limited effect. Pinning sounds much better. We'll see how it goes
    That sounds like a learned obsessive compulsive bahaviour. maybe he has been habitually kicked by somebody which might also be why he doesn't like hands waving about or somebody played with him by pretending to kick hence the simulated attack behaviour. I can't claim to be an expert on the matter. My two dogs are rescue dogs from the dogs trust which we were lucky enough to get as pups so haven't had to deal with too many problems but I know plenty who have be it a fear (hence likelihood to bite) of children or of men because they were abused by such in previous households, getting the trust of such a dog takes a lot of patience. You also see a lot of dogs that are hostile to other dogs because they were never let off the lead to play as pups so they never learned to socialise so they get attacked and attack other dogs because their behaviour is odd. I always think one of the reasons dobermans and rottweilers have a reputation for attacking or being attacked is because other dogs don't see the tail and assume aggression which is by the by. Where I live there is almost an inverted snobbery - you have a pedigree does that meanthe dogs trust wouldn't let you have one - vetting procedures are very strict.

    You know, one funny thing about the situation: his name is Oscar...

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    Re: Dogs are much smarter than cats

    This thread was obviously written by a dog.

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    Re: Dogs are much smarter than cats

    He's had one doting owner since he was a pup. No ill treatment anyone is aware of - until he got the shock of his life when I turned him on his back and pinned him when he wouldn't stop growling at me. He got one good chomp in so I'll be seeing if I need a tetanus top up tomorrow (probably do). That was the first time. The two times since then I've had a better technique and hurt him less - just got him on his back and held him in place

    I've been looking on the internet to see what it says about pinning them on their back and the ones I've found so far say it's a bad and out of date idea because it is now known the aggression can have many different causes and these causes should be addressed. They then list a whole lot of them but not, "Knows he's top dog and resents anyone else interfering with his right to behave as he likes." At least he now knows that aggression to me has unpleasant consequences. Hopefully that's a step forward.

    At present he's appalled and shocked at the way he has been treated since he's never had anything like it in his life before as far as anyone knows. It's been fairly unpleasant for all concerned. However, I suppose the biggest step forward is that his missus is so p'd off with his behaviour that she's allowed the attempt to be made. Until yesterday she'd never have allowed anyone to do anything - her walking past and doing nothing to help him today may have been the biggest shock of all for him, unless I'm giving his brain too much credit.
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    Re: Dogs are much smarter than cats

    Don't pin him on his back put him on his side and pin him down, gently, you don't need to use force really you're not trying to terrorise him. Your best sanction is to completely ignore him until he's behaving the way you want but also show him what it is you want him to do. You might find this of interest.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azkHdVBCMkM

    Have a look at the dog whispere r- he gets a lot of criticism but I think there is merit in his approach. I had my dogs as pups a dalmatian and a collie both types that can be a nightmare if not trained. Haven't worked out how to stop the collie chasing cars and more importantly mountain bikers especially the ones that come from behind with no warning.

    My wife used to do agility with them at one contest there was an eleven year old girl competing with a rottweiller, sitting it was at eye level with her. To say the level of control she had was impressive is to put it mildly.

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    Re: Dogs are much smarter than cats

    Well, some progress has been made. He's still waay too territorial when there's food around, and resents attention anywhere other than on him but really the big change is in his mistress who has become thoroughly peeved with his behaviour and is actually exerting some discipline. Castration is planned but we'll see if it really happens.
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    Re: Dogs are much smarter than cats

    Like I said I found the dog whisperer stuff quite helpful although I had mine well in hand before I even heard of him (somebody goimg on about pack leader tweaked my curiosity.)
    and pups don't have to unlearn stuff first so it's easier-

    If you missus is anything like mine was she probably has a discussion with the dog rather than just giving it a command. it's leave! not leave now you know that isn't yours now be a good boy you'll get yours in a minute.

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    Re: Dogs are much smarter than cats

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    Not my missus but yeah, that's right about the discussion. She's making an effort but I'm going to have to take issue seriously with him again at the current rate of progress. He was better for a while but has started pushing the boundaries again. The sooner he gets the snip the better but no-one has much cash after Christmas. Oh yes, and she watches the dog whisperer a lot and talks about all his tips. Does them a couple of times then it disappears in other things...However he's very pro the snip so it does seem to have helped. Chuckle. Her boys weren't too happy with the idea but then he bit them both on the same evening and sealed his fate!

    It's hard to blame a breed for being what we've created, but I really don't know why anyone would want this pint size pest. Has a face like an ewok I suppose, so looks cute.

    The ex tom cat is very smart for a cat. Goes for a walk with his owner and the dog pretty much every night and beats up the dog when needed. Completely cool.
    The crowd: "Yes! We are all individuals!"
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