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Thread: Rising sea levels

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    Senior Member Týr's Avatar
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    Rising sea levels

    I note that a rise in sea level is considered inevitable, according to scientific consensus. I cite as an example:
    Key glaciers in West Antarctica are in an irreversible retreat, a study team led by the US space agency (Nasa) says. It analysed 40 years of observations of six big ice streams draining into the Amundsen Bay and concluded that nothing now can stop them melting away.

    Although these are abrupt changes, the timescales involved are likely measured in centuries, the researchers add. If the glaciers really do disappear, they would add roughly 1.2m to global sea level rise.

    BBC News - 'Nothing can stop retreat' of West Antarctic glaciers
    We at ForumGarden should feel compelled to avert this projected rise, particularly since I'm about to move to within half a mile of the coast.

    There would appear to be two reasons for the rise in sea level. Extra water is being added to the sea, and seawater is expanding because it - the water - is getting warmer.

    I can offer no way of reducing the sea's increasing temperature. Nor of reducing the amount of additional water being added to the sea by way of those melting icecaps and glaciers currently situated on land.

    A fruitful approach would seem to be sequestering an appropriate offset amount of water from the oceans and putting it where it makes no further contribution to sea level. We could thereby maintain sea level at its current height indefinitely. No coastal region will flood, the Somerset Levels will be endangered solely by rain and inappropriate development as in the past, the Maldives will continue to exist and the world will have one (admittedly minor) global warming problem off its hands.

    If we build a large retaining wall around, for example, the Gobi Desert or the Sahara, and pump seawater uphill into the reservoir thus created, it might accommodate enough to counterbalance the expansion and the added melt water. The Sahara's the better bet, it's not so far uphill. If we're lucky the resultant saltwater lake might generate more rainfall in Australia as a byproduct.

    That's only a first suggestion but I can't see any immediate flaw.
    Long Live General Kim Jong-un, the Shining Sun!

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    Senior Member Bruv's Avatar
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    Re: Rising sea levels

    What about the displaced camels ?
    I thought I knew more than this until I opened my mouth

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    High Priestess of Cardis theia's Avatar
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    Re: Rising sea levels

    Good point, Bruv
    Live the questions now. Perhaps you will then gradually, without noticing it, live along some distant day into the answers...Rainer Maria Rilke

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    Senior Member Týr's Avatar
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    Re: Rising sea levels

    There are dunes atop which a camel might stand.
    Long Live General Kim Jong-un, the Shining Sun!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Bruv's Avatar
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    Re: Rising sea levels

    Quote Originally Posted by Týr View Post
    There are dunes atop which a camel might stand.
    Best you re-calculate the volume of water, or are you assuming the water will just soak away like on the beach, because I don't think those dunes are high enough.
    I thought I knew more than this until I opened my mouth

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    Senior Member Týr's Avatar
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    Re: Rising sea levels

    I fear you may have formed a mental image of a garden wall surrounding several million square miles of paddling pool. Those dunes are a half mile higher than the bits round the edges.

    The walls of the reservoir, at around a thousand feet high, are necessarily thick enough to contain corridors and rooms with outward-facing windows. My intention is to house the entire Palestinian population in comfort, with spectacular views across all the touristy parts of Chad and Morocco and suchlike places, after which ForumGarden may well be in line for a Nobel Peace Prize.

    I would point out that the Sahara is predominantly comprised of sand which as every fule kno is the main ingredient of concrete. The wall to all intents and purposes already exists in situ, it just needs lifting into place with sufficient cement and seawater to set. Bob, as they say, is your uncle.
    Long Live General Kim Jong-un, the Shining Sun!

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    Senior Member Wandrin's Avatar
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    Re: Rising sea levels

    Since drought is a current and projected problem, why not build large scale desalination plants and pump the water to the areas with the problem? That would increase the food supply and greenery and help mitigate some of the problems. Use wave power generators for the desalination and pumping power needs.

    It should take years for the water to make its way back to the oceans.

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    Senior Member Bruv's Avatar
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    Re: Rising sea levels

    Have you started laying out the foundations yet....................time is of the essence, I suggest quite deep, we don't want any problems later.
    I thought I knew more than this until I opened my mouth

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    Re: Rising sea levels

    Quote Originally Posted by Wandrin View Post
    Since drought is a current and projected problem, why not build large scale desalination plants and pump the water to the areas with the problem? That would increase the food supply and greenery and help mitigate some of the problems. Use wave power generators for the desalination and pumping power needs.

    It should take years for the water to make its way back to the oceans.
    Bah ha ha hahah ha aha ha ha ah aha ha ha aha!!!!!!!..........breathe...........BWAHAHAHAHAH AHAHAHAHAHahahahahahaha.!!!!!!!

    Oh Christ .sorry that's funny .

    yeah why not take a leaf out of our governments book ...lets put a desal plant along a pristine coastline........ Where there is massive flooding and rainfall............. a place that sits on a gigantic water table that takes up half the state.....but a damn is out of the question because greenies don't want isolated areas of our state underwater ..........even when it's cheaper and we need that rainwater that flows off into the sea!!!!!...........but that's okay the Desal plant is there to desalinate it back onto land again......Ummm is that bloody plant operating yet? .........NO!!!!! Because it doesn't work and it's too expensive to operate!!!!!


    AAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!! And the taxpayer funded it!!!!! You see? this is exactly what makes people go postal!!!!

  10. #10
    Senior Member Týr's Avatar
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    Re: Rising sea levels

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wandrin View Post
    Since drought is a current and projected problem, why not build large scale desalination plants and pump the water to the areas with the problem? That would increase the food supply and greenery and help mitigate some of the problems. Use wave power generators for the desalination and pumping power needs.

    It should take years for the water to make its way back to the oceans.
    Some numbers might help at this stage...

    328 km3 of seawater is equivalent to a 0.9mm sea level change... see http://www.giss.nasa.gov/research/briefs/gornitz_06/

    ... so to sequester, say, 2m of sea level rise,

    328 *2000 /0.9 = 700,000 km3 seawater needs to be held in a land reservoir.

    The Sahara covers 9,400,000 km2... see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sahara

    ... so the sequestered seawater would lie 77m deep across the Sahara, or 250 feet deep in Imperial terms, at which point sea level would have dropped by two metres worldwide (which is then available for a two metre rise in sea level to get it back to today's height).

    World desalination capacity is projected to be 120 million m3 per day by 2020... see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desalination

    ... at which rate the land reservoir could be desalinated over a period of 16,000 years. The trouble with drinking it or using it for agriculture is that it then, as you point out, gets back into the sea, so the land reservoir will need to be kept filled and merely used as a saltwater supply for desalination in that geographic region along with any other convenient bit of coast.
    Long Live General Kim Jong-un, the Shining Sun!

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