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Thread: 20th Century British Humour.

  1. #1
    Senior Member gordonartist's Avatar
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    20th Century British Humour.

    I found this on the ionternet.

    Some themes which underpinned twentieth-century British humour were:

    Smut and innuendo with sexual and scatological themes, typified by:
    the seaside postcards of Donald McGill
    the humour of Benny Hill
    the series of Carry On films
    the comic magazine Viz

    Disrespect to members of the establishment and authority, typified by:
    Beyond the Fringe, stage revue from the 1960s
    Private Eye, satirical magazine
    Spitting Image, TV puppet comedy lampooning the famous and powerful
    Discworld, a series of fantasy books written by Terry Pratchett, heavy with irony criticizing various aspects of society

    The absurd, typified by:
    The Goon Show
    Monty Python

    The banality of everyday life, as seen in:
    Hancock's Half Hour
    The Office
    The Royle Family
    Peep Show (television)
    The Giles cartoons

    The 'war' between parents/teachers and their children, typified by:
    The Beano and The Dandy, comics of publisher D C Thomson.
    Just William, books by Richmal Crompton
    Molesworth and St. Trinians, books and films

    The British class system, especially pompous or dim-witted members of the upper/middle classes or embarrassingly blatant social climbers, typified by:
    Jeeves and Wooster, books by P. G. Wodehouse
    Dad's Army, comedy TV series
    Fawlty Towers, comedy TV series
    Keeping Up Appearances, comedy TV series
    You Rang, M'Lord?, comedy TV series

    The lovable rogue, usually an impoverished working class lad trying to make some money and better himself, typified by:
    Steptoe and Son
    Only Fools and Horses
    Flashman

    The embarrassment of social ineptitude, typified by:
    Mr. Bean, comedy TV series starring Rowan Atkinson
    Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em, comedy TV series starring Michael Crawford
    Alan Partridge

    Making fun of foreigners, sometimes bordering on racism and especially common in television sitcoms and films of the 1970s, typified by:
    Love Thy Neighbour, TV programme that Bill Bryson once referred to as 'My Neighbour's a Darkie'
    Mind Your Language
    Till Death Us Do Part, TV sitcom which mocked its own main character, Alf Garnett, for his racism
    The Italian Job, film starring Michael Caine in which British criminals mock the Italian Mafia and authorities

    Harsh sarcasm, typified by:
    Blackadder, comedy TV series

    Do you like British Comedy?

    Take care.

    Gordon.

  2. #2
    Diuretic
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    Re: 20th Century British Humour.

    Yes I like it and that's a very interesting summary gordonartist. Can I add one to "Disrespect to members of the establishment and authority" ?- That Was The Week That Was - early 1960s, David Frost and a host of talent.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bez's Avatar
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    Re: 20th Century British Humour.

    Quote Originally Posted by gordonartist

    The absurd, typified by:
    The Goon Show
    Monty Python

    The banality of everyday life, as seen in:
    Hancock's Half Hour


    The British class system, especially pompous or dim-witted members of the upper/middle classes or embarrassingly blatant social climbers, typified by:

    Dad's Army, comedy TV series
    Fawlty Towers, comedy TV series
    Keeping Up Appearances, comedy TV series


    The lovable rogue, usually an impoverished working class lad trying to make some money and better himself, typified by:
    Steptoe and Son
    Only Fools and Horses


    The embarrassment of social ineptitude, typified by:
    Mr. Bean, comedy TV series starring Rowan Atkinson
    Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em, comedy TV series starring Michael Crawford


    Making fun of foreigners, sometimes bordering on racism and especially common in television sitcoms and films of the 1970s, typified by:
    Love Thy Neighbour, TV programme that Bill Bryson once referred to as 'My Neighbour's a Darkie'
    Mind Your Language
    Till Death Us Do Part, TV sitcom which mocked its own main character, Alf Garnett, for his racism
    The Italian Job, film starring Michael Caine in which British criminals mock the Italian Mafia and authorities

    Harsh sarcasm, typified by:
    Blackadder, comedy TV series
    Hi Gordon
    I Like some of the stuff on your list, but my favourites tend to be any thing with Ronnie Barker, Joanne Lumley, Morecomb and wise , Jimmy Tarbuck, Lenny Henry, Marti Caine etc. Unfortunately most of the stuff I tune into nowadays is foul mouthed and doesn't appeal to me at all....must be a bit old fashioned I guess
    A smile is a window on your face to show your heart is home

  4. #4
    SnoozeControl
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    Re: 20th Century British Humour.

    I like Terry Pratchett, The Office and The Black Adder very much.

    My mom used to watch Benny Hill, and even though she'd gasp in horror if she accidently saw something "sexy" in a movie, she thought Benny was the king of comedy. I still don't really get it.

    Where does "The Young Ones" fit in? That show is where I first saw/heard of Madness.

  5. #5
    Supporting Member spot's Avatar
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    Re: 20th Century British Humour.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bez
    ... Joanne Lumley ...
    Ah. Satire.

    British 20th century humor quite often involved music too. Who recalls "My pink half of the drainpipe" as a definitive take on Anglo-French relations?

  6. #6
    Clancy
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    Re: 20th Century British Humour.

    Sometimes our humour can be very dark, and can seem a bit...sinister. Gallows humour is used quite a bit, I think it's a throw back to the days when life was very hard. Up and down the, UK you will often hear dark humour. It's just our way of getting through life.....we "don't really have those thoughts in our heads...like I said it's like a safety valve to keep us from igniting, as it were.

    Many of the tv shows on that list use dark humour. the "Blackadder" series, being just one that others across the pond will have seen, and if a movie example is needed, check something like, "Lock Stock & Two Smoking Barrels" or, "Snatch", where gallows humour is employed throughout.

    Another movie that many thought sacrilegious, was, "The Life Of Brian" it's neither sacrilegious, or anti, religious in general. What it depicts (very humorously) is how easy it is for false prophets to emerge within your midst, and for followers to be duped. Many of our clergy picked up on that instantly.....where other clergy took it literally, and missed the whole point.

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    Senior Member LottomagicZ4941's Avatar
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    Re: 20th Century British Humour.

    Find Dr Who mildly amusing.

    Not quite as serious as American Sci FI.

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    Supporting Member spot's Avatar
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    Re: 20th Century British Humour.

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    Ronnie Barker (putting on his helmet before inspecting the troops in India): It's too damn small, look at it. I mean, can't something be done about it Bligh?

    Ronnie Corbett: We could try taking the pith out of it sir!

    Ronnie Barker: Most of the lads do that already.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ijbpzx9Cf0

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