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Thread: Mad puppy syndrome

  1. #11
    Senior Member cherandbuster's Avatar
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    Re: Mad puppy syndrome

    *leaves all professional, rational, and brilliant advice giving to BR and Val*

    Oh what a cute little boy!

    Who has licks for Auntie Cher?!!
    Live Life with
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  2. #12
    I think, therefore I post chonsigirl's Avatar
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    Re: Mad puppy syndrome

    Oh, what a lovely puppy you have Arnold!

    I wonder if we need a crate for Nomad?

  3. #13
    Senior Member cherandbuster's Avatar
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    Re: Mad puppy syndrome

    Quote Originally Posted by chonsigirl
    Oh, what a lovely puppy you have Arnold!

    I wonder if we need a crate for Nomad?
    Chonsi

    I recommend a muzzle as well
    Live Life with
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  4. #14
    SnoozeControl
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    Re: Mad puppy syndrome

    How fun for you Arnold, you can dress her up in girly dog clothes.


  5. #15
    Watanya Cecilia valerie's Avatar
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    Re: Mad puppy syndrome

    Hey Auntie Val will take some kisses, too!!

    Good link BR and yes I'm a fan of crate training. Tamsen was the first
    pup I'd ever used a crate with... and she was completely, reliably
    (to the point of being left loose in the house at night) housetrained,
    NO accidents, by 11 1/2 weeks old. Can't beat it.

    Vigilance is key. I think the rule for them being able to "hold it" is
    1 hour for every month of age, so puppers should only be asked to
    wait for 2 hours right now. That's the rule, but if it were me training
    a pup again (and I plan on never doing another! ) I'd go
    overboard on the trips outside. ALWAYS go with her to her potty spot,
    act like a maniac with the praise when she goes. Take her out after eating,
    after naps, after play... lots.

    For the chewing and dominance issues, what BR said about the NO's
    and the "alpha rolls" are very good. I would only add, she is NOT too
    young to practice NILIF (Nothing In Life is Free) with. I'd nip this
    stuff in the bud right now while she's small. Here is a basic website,
    if you want to get into it more there are others.
    http://www.k9deb.com/nilif.htm

    Don't cater to the puppy. (Except of course for her potty needs!) Her
    wolf ancestors would have taught her her place in your pack, minus those
    guys you will have to do it. Get the whole family on board with this, it
    isn't going to work if one person tells her no for something and the other
    one laughs at the behavior. (AHEM, Tamsen turned out fine but her daddy
    was guilty of this!!)

    For chewies, one thing I liked to do was get some baguettes, cut them
    in pieces, and leave them on top of the fridge or something until they
    dry out. They won't hurt the pup if she consumes them, and will give
    her a workout meanwhile. Any time she goes for something she shouldn't,
    SUBSTITUTE. Rotate toys, if she needs it (Tamsen did) and stick one of
    those in her mouth. Something called a "Kong" is good, you can put
    peanut butter in them and they work forever getting it out.

    If you don't want to go the crate route, you can tether her next to
    you at night. With her own bed. I'd say she's not allowed on any
    furniture for a loooong time, but that's really up to you.

    When you take her in for her vet exam, you might ask them about
    picking her water up at a certain time in the evening. Helps make for
    fewer nightime trips. I never did this, though, didn't feel I needed to and
    worries about other problems (UTI's) if I did.

    I'm so excited for you!! Pat her pink little puppy tummy for me!!

    Tamsen's Dogster Page
    http://www.dogster.com/?27525


  6. #16
    ArnoldLayne
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    Re: Mad puppy syndrome

    Thanks BR and Val. I have printed off the crate training and NILIF articles.

    Snooze, if I had the oportunity, you would be pulled round on a lead wearing the dress that pug is wearing.

    Oh sorry ! That IS you

  7. #17
    Starting Over in 2007! LilacDragon's Avatar
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    Re: Mad puppy syndrome

    Sounds like you have a perfectly wonderful, puppy on your hand.

    At this age, you have a puppy that knows absolutely nothing about commands, where to potty or what is safe to chew on. Fairness and consistancy is the rule.

    Potty training can be accomplished with a good schedule and a sharp eye. Remember, dogs don't think like people do, so unless you catch the little terrorist..umm..terrier in the act, scolding will do you no good at all. Every time she goes outside, tell her how marvelous she is and make a big deal out of it. If she starts to go on the floor, simply tell her no, scoop her up and take her outside. She should go outside about 15 minutes after eating, immediately after rough indoor play and immediately after a nap. Also, it is important that you let her go when she is outside, even if it means you are out longer then you had hoped to be.

    As for biting - at 8 weeks old, she shouldn't be teething yet. But, think on this - babies (of the two legged type) pick up everything and put it in their mouths. Puppies are much the same. But they have no hands, so the mouth it is. If she is biting you then you can stand up and remove your hands from her reach. If she is chewing a pantleg or foot, then your best bet is to give her a toy that she can chew instead. You might find that having a stash of small toys is handy as you can keep one on your person at all times. Be sure to tell her no when you remove your body part and yes when she has the toy!

    While I have never disagreed with BR on pet advice before, I must warn about rolling a puppy on it's back. While once a regularly accepted method of teaching a pup who is boss, it is no longer thought of as such. I will explain why. By the time one decides that they must explain to a puppy who is boss, the puppy is on a tear. Adrenaline is flowing and the pup is a bit worked up, maybe even mad that you won't let it do what it wants to. The last thing a dog of any age wants when it is in a "mood" like this is to be forced into a submissive position and the reaction you will get is not for the dog to calm down, but to fight even more then it was when you started. Sure, if you hold it on it's back long enough, sooner or later it is bound to relent and give up. What you need to do is stop the aggitation as quickly as possible. Redirecting usually works best.
    Sandi


  8. #18
    Watanya Cecilia valerie's Avatar
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    Re: Mad puppy syndrome

    Couple things I wanted to mention: A tired puppy is a good puppy.
    Long play times=long nap times.

    And here are 2 really good books:
    The Art of Raising a Puppy by the Monks of New Skete
    The Dog Listener by Jan Fennell

    Tamsen's Dogster Page
    http://www.dogster.com/?27525


  9. #19
    ArnoldLayne
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    Re: Mad puppy syndrome

    Thanks for that LD.

    Its interesting about the issue of dominance and assertiveness. Our first dog, Sam, was immediate in his submission without ever needing to be taught. He would always roll on to his back whenever you approached him, well in his early years anyway. This obviously made for a totally pain free, 20 years of joy, as he always did as he was told, and happily so.

    I can tell we have our work cut out. But it will be enjoyable nonetheless

  10. #20
    Senior Member buttercup's Avatar
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    Re: Mad puppy syndrome

    Register to remove this ad.
    this is the thing that concerns me about having a pup, my lia was just like your sam, she once ripped up some lino & chewed buttons off clothes a few times, other than that evrything was perfect, couldent ask for a better dog, i will be watching this thread to see how things go before i venture into pup world again
    we're very lucky here in the garden to have such knowledgeble members on the subject
    p.s - your pup's a very hansome breed

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