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Thread: Tales of Maori cannibalism told in a new book .

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    Senior Member pantsonfire321@aol.com's Avatar
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    Tales of Maori cannibalism told in a new book .

    Tales of Maori cannibalism told in new book
    Tuesday, 05 August 2008

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    Maori cannibalism was widespread throughout New Zealand until the mid 1800s but has largely been ignored in history books, says the author of a new book released this week.


    Paul Moon said his new book, This Horrid Practice, looked at the Maori tradition of eating each other in what was a particularly violent society before Europeans arrived in New Zealand.

    Cannibalism lasted for several hundred years until the 1830s although there were a few isolated cases after that, said Professor Moon, a Pakeha history professor at Te Ara Poutama, the Maori Development Unit at the Auckland University of Technology.

    He also said infanticide was also widely practised because tribes wanted men to be warriors and mothers often killed their female daughters by smothering them or pushing a finger through the soft tissue of the skull to kill them immediately.

    He said the widespread practice of cannibalism was not a food issue but people were eaten often as part of a post-battle rage. Enemies were often captured and killed later to be eaten or killed because of a minor transgression.

    "Rather than disposing of the body it was prepared to be eaten," he said.

    Part of the practice was also to send a warning to other tribes.

    "One of the arguments is really if you want to punish your enemy killing them is not enough. If you can chop them up and eat them and turn them into excrement that is the greatest humiliation you can impose on them."

    Prof Moon said historians often said Maori were not cannibals and based their findings on European standards.

    "The amount of evidence is so overwhelming it would be unfair to pretend it didn't happen. It is too important to ignore," said Prof Moon.

    The head of the Maori Studies Department at Auckland University, Professor Margaret Mutu, who had not read Prof Moon's book, said cannibalism was widespread throughout New Zealand.

    "It was definitely there. It's recorded in all sorts of ways in our histories and traditions, a lot of place names refer to it.

    "It was part of our culture."

    She said Maori cannibalism was not referred to by many historians because it was counter to English culture.

    "You will get your English-based historians who come out of an English culture who don't understand it and avoid it because they don't understand it.

    "If you don't understand it you're risking misinterpreting it badly if you try to address it."

    Prof Mutu said she knew of no Pakeha historians who knew how to balance parts of the Maori culture they could not see an equivalent to in the English culture.

    "If you don't understand the things you are talking about you take one hell of a risk."

    She said Prof Moon did not understand the history of cannibalism and it was "very, very hard for a Pakeha to get it right on these things especially when they don't know how to interrogate it from within the culture and interrogating it from within the culture means interrogating it from within the language.

    "He is braver than I would be," she said.

    - NZPA
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    Re: Tales of Maori cannibalism told in a new book .

    ooh gruesome!!


    glad they dont do it any more

  3. #3
    jimbo
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    Re: Tales of Maori cannibalism told in a new book .

    i have read the book , if your a clown they wont eat you .... they think you taste funny

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    Re: Tales of Maori cannibalism told in a new book .

    I read that after the missionaries arrived, the Maori's came out with a whole new line of food. Cream - of- catholic soup, baked Baptist, pureed protestant and others.

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    LIFE IS SHORT...LIVE HARD Nomad's Avatar
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    Re: Tales of Maori cannibalism told in a new book .

    Quote Originally Posted by suzy_creamcheese View Post
    ooh gruesome!!


    glad they dont do it any more
    Dont be so sure about that, if you know what Im sayin...
    I AM AWESOME MAN

  6. #6
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    Re: Tales of Maori cannibalism told in a new book .

    Ha ha ha aha hahahhahahhaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa*cough* whoa lost my breath then .

    Obviously none of you have ever seen a six foot (both ways) Maori looking menacingly for a fight? Only an idiot would stick around ...........think of it as cleaning the gene pool. they're only eating the idiots.

    Although Aboriginals used to eat the kidneys of the dead. Something to do with obtaining the spirit or something. Or maybe they were hungry, I don't know. And Zulus also ate their dead enemy .............but that's put down to drug induced frenzy.

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    Re: Tales of Maori cannibalism told in a new book .

    Obviously none of you have ever seen a six foot (both ways) Maori looking menacingly for a fight? Only an idiot would stick around
    Clearly you dont know how big of an idiot I am then !
    I AM AWESOME MAN

  8. #8
    fuzzy butt
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    Re: Tales of Maori cannibalism told in a new book .

    It's Okay Nom I've have a fair idea

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    Re: Tales of Maori cannibalism told in a new book .

    Quote Originally Posted by fuzzy butt View Post
    It's Okay Nom I've have a fair idea

    Why I outta !
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    Re: Tales of Maori cannibalism told in a new book .

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    Quote Originally Posted by pantsonfire321@aol.com View Post
    Tales of Maori cannibalism told in new book
    Tuesday, 05 August 2008

    Email a Friend | Printable View | Have Your Say Related Links
    Subscribe to Archivestuff
    Have your say

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    Maori cannibalism was widespread throughout New Zealand until the mid 1800s but has largely been ignored in history books, says the author of a new book released this week.


    Paul Moon said his new book, This Horrid Practice, looked at the Maori tradition of eating each other in what was a particularly violent society before Europeans arrived in New Zealand.

    Cannibalism lasted for several hundred years until the 1830s although there were a few isolated cases after that, said Professor Moon, a Pakeha history professor at Te Ara Poutama, the Maori Development Unit at the Auckland University of Technology.

    He also said infanticide was also widely practised because tribes wanted men to be warriors and mothers often killed their female daughters by smothering them or pushing a finger through the soft tissue of the skull to kill them immediately.

    He said the widespread practice of cannibalism was not a food issue but people were eaten often as part of a post-battle rage. Enemies were often captured and killed later to be eaten or killed because of a minor transgression.

    "Rather than disposing of the body it was prepared to be eaten," he said.

    Part of the practice was also to send a warning to other tribes.

    "One of the arguments is really if you want to punish your enemy killing them is not enough. If you can chop them up and eat them and turn them into excrement that is the greatest humiliation you can impose on them."

    Prof Moon said historians often said Maori were not cannibals and based their findings on European standards.

    "The amount of evidence is so overwhelming it would be unfair to pretend it didn't happen. It is too important to ignore," said Prof Moon.

    The head of the Maori Studies Department at Auckland University, Professor Margaret Mutu, who had not read Prof Moon's book, said cannibalism was widespread throughout New Zealand.

    "It was definitely there. It's recorded in all sorts of ways in our histories and traditions, a lot of place names refer to it.

    "It was part of our culture."

    She said Maori cannibalism was not referred to by many historians because it was counter to English culture.

    "You will get your English-based historians who come out of an English culture who don't understand it and avoid it because they don't understand it.

    "If you don't understand it you're risking misinterpreting it badly if you try to address it."

    Prof Mutu said she knew of no Pakeha historians who knew how to balance parts of the Maori culture they could not see an equivalent to in the English culture.

    "If you don't understand the things you are talking about you take one hell of a risk."

    She said Prof Moon did not understand the history of cannibalism and it was "very, very hard for a Pakeha to get it right on these things especially when they don't know how to interrogate it from within the culture and interrogating it from within the culture means interrogating it from within the language.

    "He is braver than I would be," she said.

    - NZPA



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