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Thread: healthy food v unhealthy food

  1. #1
    jimbo
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    healthy food v unhealthy food

    i like subway but i was astonished to see on tv it was one of the worst fast food places

    if i have been good on my diet and feel i deserve a treat nothing hits the spot like a burgur king monster burger whopper thingy and the bk fries are the best

    October 12, 2007 - 12:00am
    By Nathan Sermonis

    New research by Cornell’s Prof. Brian Wansink, director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab, shows that dining at “healthy” fast food restaurants may not be as beneficial as advertised, often leading to poor eating habits.
    Despite a growing health conscience in America, two-thirds of the national population is considered overweight according the National Center for Health Statistics. Wansink’s research may help to explain one of the reasons behind this perplexing paradox.
    By comparing eating habits at two restaurants — McDonald’s and Subway —Wansink observed two important trends. First, customers at Subway, the “healthy” restaurant, consistently underestimated the number of calories in each meal. Second, customers at Subway were more likely to choose higher-calorie side dishes. Accounting for the combined effects of these consumer tendencies, Wansink’s study concluded that eating at “healthy” restaurants may be unhealthier than people think.
    Although “healthy” fast food restaurants like Subway do offer low-calorie dishes, not all meals on the menu are as healthy as customers assume them to be. According to Wansink, many of these restaurants often use relative words like “fresh” and “low-carb” to describe menu items, leading people to think something is good to eat when it really isn’t.
    “If you really want to estimate what you’re eating, the best thing to do is guess the number of calories and double that,” said Wansink.
    One prescription for this dilemma is to require fast food restaurants to post calorie counts on their menu boards. The Center for Science in the Public Interest advocates this strategy as a way to provide people with the information they need to make healthy food choices when eating out.
    Margo Wootan ’86, director of nutrition policy at the CSPI, said, “There is a tremendous amount of interest in eating healthy, but ... too many times, people think they’re making healthy choices when they’re not.”
    However, while calorie displays may lead to more informed decisions, Wansink feels this approach would not necessarily lead to healthier decisions.
    “I don’t think it would change behavior,” he said. “It might actually backfire because people still like the indulgent.”
    Wansink said that providing calorie counts would likely discourage diners from trying to eat healthy when they find out that most of the things they enjoy at “healthy” restaurants are poor choices. Blaming the “what the heck” effect, he argues that customers would probably choose to eat unhealthier but better tasting foods rather than continue trying to eat well at “healthy” restaurants.
    Last month, a NYC court case dealt with this very issue of posting calorie counts. In its decision, the court ruled in favor of the New York State Restaurant Association, arguing against requiring fast food restaurants to display calorie information on menus. While many chain restaurants provide nutrition facts on company websites, the court ruled that the City could not force these restaurants to post the information on store menus.
    Rick Sampson, president of the NYSRA, praised the court’s decision. He said the City should not single out and penalize quick service restaurants, many of who already provide nutrition information in other forms.
    Many people in the restaurant industry, including Sampson, feel the answer to America’s eating problem is not regulation, but consumer education.
    “The answer is education,” he said. “It’s about educating in schools. It’s about educating parents.”
    Anikka Stensson, manager of media relations at the National Restaurant Association said, “Restaurants everywhere offer a variety of healthful menu options to fit anyone’s dietary needs and preferences, but it’s up to each person to order those options.”
    Sampson feels that in order for the food industry to change what it offers customers, people must demand healthier foods.
    “In our business, we give our customers what they want. If we don’t we’re out of business,” he said.
    According to Wansink, what most people want right now is something that tastes good. Although many people today are trying to eat more healthily, they are not willing to sacrifice taste. Taste is what customers want, preferring the delicious to the nutritious, and that’s what restaurants will continue to offer — calories and all.

  2. #2
    ALOHA..!! CARLA's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Re: healthy food v unhealthy food

    What do they know eat what you want it all bad on someones scale. Hell growing up there were no dietary facts on the food we ate, we just ate it. I'm 61 hasn't killed me yet.

    Same thing with bottled water whats that all about its the same damn water you always drink just in a fancy bottle that will kill long before the water in your tap does with all the CEMICHALS used to make the bottles. .
    ALOHA!!
    MOTTO TO LIVE BY:
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, champagne in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming.
    WOO HOO!!, what a ride!!!"


  3. #3
    jimbo
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    Re: healthy food v unhealthy food

    Quote Originally Posted by CARLA View Post
    What do they know eat what you want it all bad on someones scale. Hell growing up there were no dietary facts on the food we ate, we just ate it. I'm 61 hasn't killed me yet.

    Same thing with bottled water whats that all about its the same damn water you always drink just in a fancy bottle that will kill long before the water in your tap does with all the CEMICHALS used to make the bottles. .

    good point carla


    it cost more than petrol /Gas in the uk yet people still buy it


    i mean if you could run car on tapwater for free you would right , so why buy a plastic cocktail that cost a fortune and poison yourself with it

  4. #4
    Senior Member sunny104's Avatar
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    Re: healthy food v unhealthy food

    I think there has to be some common sense when people are trying to eat healthy.

    Some of these sandwiches and salads have all kinds of meat and cheese and dressings on them. I mean it's probably very tasty but piling on 4 million calories on a bed of lettuce or a piece of bread isn't exactly a healthy meal.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Odie's Avatar
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    Re: healthy food v unhealthy food

    remember the guy who lost tons of weight having 2 subway shorties 2X a day...................they were stuffed with veggies only.

    high fat in those meats, cheeses, dressings, plus we all eat a regular size one.
    Life is just to short for drama.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Galbally's Avatar
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    Re: healthy food v unhealthy food

    I am not a huge fan of Subway, and in general I don't eat fast food as its overpriced crap bascially. Though with Subway, at least its not too bad compared to some of the others I suppose.

    The main point is, that if you want to eat healthily, make your own proper food, out of ingredients that you recognize as real ingredients. You know, if you want to have a beef burger, get some minced beef from a butcher, mix it with breadcrumbs, egg, onions, salt and pepper, grill it, and out it in a bun you get from the bakery on top of some salad and cheddar cheese, lovely.

    Certainly don't eat in fast food places all the time, though its fine once in a while. I tend to have a big Muccy Ds about once or twice a year as a sort of anti-health, anti eco-warrior brigade personal protest. I always have a Big Mac, Large Fries, Chicken McNuggets, and a Strawberry Milk Shake. And once or twice a year, it tastes lovely! YUM
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Odie's Avatar
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    Re: healthy food v unhealthy food

    Mr. Submarine is tons better!

    not a fan either of subway.
    Life is just to short for drama.

  8. #8
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    Re: healthy food v unhealthy food

    I myself am partial to McDonald's fries. A large please and sprinked with salt. Yes, I know I'm bad

  9. #9
    Supporting Member Chezzie's Avatar
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    Re: healthy food v unhealthy food

    Fast food is any food that is quick, convenient, and usually inexpensive. You can buy fast food just about anywhere that sells food and snacks. Vending machines and drive-thru restaurants are probably the most common places to find fast food. It's so popular because for under £4.00 you can usually get a meal that's satisfying. But fast food is inexpensive because it is usually made with cheaper ingredients such as high fat meat and foods that contain lots of unhealthy fats (saturated and trans fats) and cholesterol, instead of nutritious foods such as lean meats, fresh fruits, and vegetables.

    There is no such thing as a "bad" food. All foods can fit into a healthy meal plan! It's true that fast food is usually high in fat, calories, cholesterol, and sodium, but eating fast food every once in a while is not going to cause you problems. If you eat too much fast food over a long period of time, though, it can lead to health problems like high blood pressure, heart disease, and obesity.


    If you are having fast food more than once a week, try to make healthier choices. Here are some tips:

    Choose foods that are broiled over fried such as a grilled chicken sandwich instead of fried chicken or chicken nuggets.
    Choose soups that are not cream based.
    Have low-fat salad dressings instead of the full-fat kind.
    Have a salad or soup instead of fries.
    Use mustard or ketchup instead of mayonnaise.
    Order smaller entrée portions in general. For example: instead of a large sub, try a small sub with a side salad or piece of fruit.
    Order smalls instead of "super-sizing." A large fry has 540 calories and 26 grams of fat, but a small fry has about 60% less fat and calories (210 calories and 10 grams of fat).
    When ordering a sub or sandwich, select leaner meats like turkey or grilled chicken instead of fried items, like a burgers or steak and cheese sandwiches.
    Choose water, low-fat milk, or diet sodas instead of regular sodas, fruit drinks, and milkshakes.
    When ordering pizza, add veggies instead of meat.
    If fruit and veggies are available, try to add them into your meal. For example, have lettuce and tomato on sandwiches or burgers.

    Remember: There are many healthy food choices that are easily available, tasty, and don't cost very much that can be eaten on the go. Try to balance fast food with other nutritious foods throughout the day and make healthier choices whenever possible. Many fast food restaurants have their nutrition information available on-site or on the internet; take a look at it to help you choose healthier options.

  10. #10
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    Re: healthy food v unhealthy food

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    When I was younger and single my food choices were abominable. I ate fast food almost exclusively and in portions for two. Although I was overweight then, I still had a young man's metabolism. I couldn't get away with that now.

    I eat much more sensibly these days, although portion control still slips here and there. I stay away from fast food ordinarily, and we cook at home much more often than we dine out (there's the expense to avoid as well, there).

    Thing is, I still love British foods like sausage rolls and fish 'n' chips. How ya'll manage to live past 30 with all of your arteries intact is beyond my ken!

    [EDIT] Shame on me. I grew up in the Southern United States so it's no wonder I have an appetite for destructive foods. No disrespect intended! [/EDIT]

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