I posted this in response to someones clear misrepresentation of Paul's comments on Romans 7. I think I have made it clear enough for anyone who actually cares to know the truth, of Paul's teachings on this subject, to sit down and work through those verses to know for certain what Paul taught. But as Tolstoy once said: "Even the strongest current of water cannot add a drop to a cup which is already full. The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him."

As much as I preach against Paul, even Paul would be offended by peoples misinterpretation of Romans 7.

If you take the time to read Romans 7, you will see in verse 5 that Paul describes his experience before his conversion: in the verses after it. Notice he states Rom 7:5 For when we were in the flesh, the motions of sins, which were by the law, did work in our members to bring forth fruit unto death...

In Romans 8 verse 1 we see that Paul states (Rom 8:1) There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.

Now how do we know that Paul was not taking about his state as a follower of Christ, in verses 17-24? Simple, read them.

Rom 7:18 For I know that in me (that is, in my flesh,) dwelleth no good thing: for to will is present with me; but how to perform that which is good I find not.
Rom 7:19 For the good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do.
Rom 7:20 Now if I do that I would not, it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me.
Rom 7:21 I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me.
Rom 7:22 For I delight in the law of God after the inward man:
Rom 7:23 But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members.
Rom 7:24 O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death?

Paul clearly describing his state before conversion here, as he states in Rom 7:25 I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord. So then with the mind I myself serve the law of God; but with the flesh the law of sin. Rom 8:1 There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.
Rom 8:2 For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death.

Paul clearly taught that we serve sin through the flesh and that there is no condemnation to those in Christ who walk not after the flesh.

Paul taught that one had to be dead to the flesh to be alive in Christ, he was clearly making this statement in his opening statements of Romans 7:

Rom 7:1 Know ye not, brethren, (for I speak to them that know the law,) how that the law hath dominion over a man as long as he liveth?
Rom 7:2 For the woman which hath an husband (her flesh) is bound by the law to her husband (the flesh) so long as he liveth; but if the husband (the flesh) be dead, she is loosed from the law of her husband (the flesh).
Rom 7:3 So then if, while her husband (the flesh) liveth, she be married to another man, she shall be called an adulteress: but if her husband (the flesh) be dead, she is free from that law; so that she is no adulteress, though she be married to another man(Christ).
Rom 7:4 Wherefore, my brethren, ye also are become dead to the law by the body of Christ; that ye should be married to another, even to him who is raised from the dead, that we should bring forth fruit unto God.
Rom 7:5 For when we were in the flesh, the motions of sins, which were by the law, did work in our members to bring forth fruit unto death...

The Husband is the flesh, and if it is dead, Paul says, we are free to marry Christ.

While Paul was not an Apostle and his teachings should absolutely not be compared to Christ's, he didn't believe and embrace most of the garbage that people do today: because of how his writings have been interpreted.