Make these ads go away.
+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 21 to 24 of 24

Thread: Garden Reboot

  1. #21
    Proudly humble LarsMac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    usually on the road to somewhere.
    Posts
    10,565
    Local Date
    09-18-2019
    Local Time
    06:04 PM

    Re: Garden Reboot

    Quote Originally Posted by FG View Post
    You might find BBC News - How the world loved the swastika - until Hitler stole it an interesting read.

    If I see a black right-angled swastika on a red background I'll happily denounce it, Gill, but there's a stack of other swastika forms which never had anything to do with Nazi symbolism and I'm damned if I'll let the Third Reich steal the whole concept. Black right-angled swastika on a red background, bad symbol. Swastika, huge historical resonance over thousands of years, no problem.
    The Swastika | Jewish Virtual Library
    "The trouble with people isn't that they don't know, but that they know so much that ain't so." - Will Rogers
    "Truth isn't Truth" - Rudy Giuliani

  2. #22
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    955
    Local Date
    09-19-2019
    Local Time
    12:04 AM

    Re: Garden Reboot

    You've linked to a book, Lars. Would you like to add a comment or two reflecting your own view?

    If, today, "the symbol is most commonly associated with Nazi Germany, the Holocaust, neo-Nazis and other hate groups", that's our fault for allowing the association to be so prominent. I think we should emphasize the entire history, not the aberration. I agree that "the symbol is most commonly associated with Nazi Germany" etc, but the symbol should be the very specific black hard-edged pattern on the red background which dominated Speer's megalomaniac rallies. It's only true of swastikas in general if we're so weak-willed as to allow it.

    |||||||||||
    Who has a spare two minutes a day to play in this month's FG Trivia game!

    Your satisfactory is our goals

  3. #23
    Proudly humble LarsMac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    usually on the road to somewhere.
    Posts
    10,565
    Local Date
    09-18-2019
    Local Time
    06:04 PM

    Re: Garden Reboot

    Quote Originally Posted by FG View Post
    You've linked to a book, Lars. Would you like to add a comment or two reflecting your own view?

    If, today, "the symbol is most commonly associated with Nazi Germany, the Holocaust, neo-Nazis and other hate groups", that's our fault for allowing the association to be so prominent. I think we should emphasize the entire history, not the aberration. I agree that "the symbol is most commonly associated with Nazi Germany" etc, but the symbol should be the very specific black hard-edged pattern on the red background which dominated Speer's megalomaniac rallies. It's only true of swastikas in general if we're so weak-willed as to allow it.
    To start with, the text from my link (Which is a page from the Jewish Virtual Library) was fairly simple.
    While commonly associated with Nazi Germany, the swastika symbol is more than 3,000 years old. The term "Swastika" was originally the name for a hooked cross in Sanskrit, and swastikas have been found on artifacts, such as coins and pottery, from the ancient city of Troy.

    Not only are swastikas associated with ancient Troy, the symbols are found in many other cultures, such as Chinese, Japanese, Indian and southern European. By the Middle Ages, the swastika was a well-known symbol and had many different names, depending on the country. In some cultures, such as in ancient China, the symbol is turned counterclockwise (sauvastika).

    Throughout its history, the swastika represented life, sun, power, strength and good luck. In the early 20th century, it was still considered a positive symbol. During World War I, it was found on shoulder patches of members of the American 45th Division and the Finnish air force. Only after the Nazi period did its connotation change.

    German nationalists chose to use the swastika in the mid-19th century because it was associated with the Aryan race and Germanic history. At the end of the 19th century, German nationalists used the symbol on periodicals and for the official emblem of the German Gymnasts’ League. By the 20th century, it was a common symbol used in Germany to represent German nationalism and pride, for example, as the emblem for the Wandervogel, a German youth group. Swastikas also were used, however, in anti-Semitic periodicals.
    As for my personal feelings on the Swastika, Yes, it was hi-jacked by the German Nationalist movement. My hackles rise whenever I see the pseudo-Nazis flying the symbol of Hitlers abomination and spouting their filth.
    However, I have also adorned my meditation room with designs using the form in the style of Hindu and Buddhist decorations.
    People are too quick to react negatively to the symbol, these days.
    I thought FourPart's image was rather clever, myself, and I doubt the association to nationalism ever came to mind in the making of the thing.
    "The trouble with people isn't that they don't know, but that they know so much that ain't so." - Will Rogers
    "Truth isn't Truth" - Rudy Giuliani

  4. #24
    Senior Member FourPart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Southampton
    Posts
    6,256
    Local Date
    09-19-2019
    Local Time
    01:04 AM

    Re: Garden Reboot

    Register to remove this ad.
    As anyone on this forum know, I'm further from Nationalism than you caould imagine (as Oscar can testify), and until it was mentioned I never even considered it as being anything like a swastika. Your mind is probably just seeing something that isn't actually there, by turning a 'T' shape into an 'L'.

    It's just something for Hallowe'en - a Spider - in Four Parts. It'll be back to the original after tonight.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts