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Thread: Backpacking

  1. #11
    Senior Member Saint_'s Avatar
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    Re: Backpacking

    I spent my youth backpacking across the most wild country in America...Montana. My father and I would often use only aerial survey maps and go over 100 miles into the Bob Marshal Wilderness. An untracked wilderness of immense size.
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    Senior Member Bryn Mawr's Avatar
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    Re: Backpacking

    Quote Originally Posted by Saint_ View Post
    I spent my youth backpacking across the most wild country in America...Montana. My father and I would often use only aerial survey maps and go over 100 miles into the Bob Marshal Wilderness. An untracked wilderness of immense size.
    Spectacular - you'd need to know what you were doing though.

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    Senior Member Saint_'s Avatar
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    Re: Backpacking

    Quote Originally Posted by Bryn Mawr View Post
    Spectacular - you'd need to know what you were doing though.
    Too true. But I grew up in Colorado and Montana and was backpacking with him since I was 5 years old. By the time I was a teen, I knew more about the wilderness, and had more mountain sense than the majority of living people. I could easily make fire without tools, make shelter or find it, catch fish and food in a variety of ways, avoid dangerous wildlife, identify edible plants, make traps and tools of all kinds, navigate and keep my sense of direction,and basically survive with little or no equipment. In addition, in Montana in the winter, you need an entire other set of skills - extreme arctic survival skills. It was just one of those things we did...
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    Senior Member Bryn Mawr's Avatar
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    Re: Backpacking

    Quote Originally Posted by Saint_ View Post
    Too true. But I grew up in Colorado and Montana and was backpacking with him since I was 5 years old. By the time I was a teen, I knew more about the wilderness, and had more mountain sense than the majority of living people. I could easily make fire without tools, make shelter or find it, catch fish and food in a variety of ways, avoid dangerous wildlife, identify edible plants, make traps and tools of all kinds, navigate and keep my sense of direction,and basically survive with little or no equipment. In addition, in Montana in the winter, you need an entire other set of skills - extreme arctic survival skills. It was just one of those things we did...
    I fear that England is a manicured garden in comparison :-)

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    Senior Member Saint_'s Avatar
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    Re: Backpacking

    Well, that actually appeals more to me now in this time of life...

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    Re: Backpacking

    chuckle. I'd be dead inside a week, if I hadn't walked out. Absolutely lovely though - on a nice day...

    Bryn's comparison with a manicured garden for England is very apt - there are wild bits but no part is free of man's firm imprint, the deforestation being probably the most noticeable feature. Most of what we have now is plantations rather than ancient woodland. chuckle. I suppose walking in England is more a history tour than anything else: As soon as you are on the local footpaths and bridleways which are shown on Ordnance Survey maps you are on ancient routes that go back hundreds or sometimes thousands of years and there are burial mounds and standing stones and the remains of castles and old buildings all over the place. The other thing about that sort of walking is that you can bed and breakfast most places if you want to (or use hotels if you have the money) and walk with just a day pack
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    Re: Backpacking

    Montana is way out of my league. I may still get back to Wales and Scotland though.

    As for B&B, I try to budget for £5 a day though i take food as well. Lithuanian army rations off eBay most recently and very good they are too.

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    Senior Member Saint_'s Avatar
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    Re: Backpacking

    Quote Originally Posted by Clodhopper View Post
    As soon as you are on the local footpaths and bridleways which are shown on Ordnance Survey maps you are on ancient routes that go back hundreds or sometimes thousands of years and there are burial mounds and standing stones and the remains of castles and old buildings all over the place. The other thing about that sort of walking is that you can bed and breakfast most places if you want to (or use hotels if you have the money) and walk with just a day pack
    That sounds much more to my liking at my age. I'll have to consider that for a vacation...and of course, I'll be visiting 221B Baker Street!

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    Re: Backpacking

    Well, if you are a Sherlock Holmes fan there's a possible walk taking in the Hound of the Baskervilles - that's all based on real places on the edge of Dartmoor if I remember right. Speaking personally I think the most interesting walking is on the edges of Dartmoor rather than much of Dartmoor itself though I think the ancient routes across the moor would be worth doing (I haven't yet).

    Oh, and something about the address rang bells beyond it being Sherlock Holmes' so I had a quick google and it seems 221b Baker St didn't exist when the books were written - Baker Street existed but the numbers didn't at that time go that high. Later the street was extended and 221b was part of a local bank until it closed down and the Sherlock Holmes museum took the number over. Chuckle. If you are a very serious fan you might well know all that but I didn't!
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  10. #20
    Senior Member Saint_'s Avatar
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    Re: Backpacking

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clodhopper View Post
    Well, if you are a Sherlock Holmes fan there's a possible walk taking in the Hound of the Baskervilles - that's all based on real places on the edge of Dartmoor if I remember right. Speaking personally I think the most interesting walking is on the edges of Dartmoor rather than much of Dartmoor itself though I think the ancient routes across the moor would be worth doing (I haven't yet).
    That sounds way cool!

    Oh, and something about the address rang bells beyond it being Sherlock Holmes' so I had a quick google and it seems 221b Baker St didn't exist when the books were written - Baker Street existed but the numbers didn't at that time go that high. Later the street was extended and 221b was part of a local bank until it closed down and the Sherlock Holmes museum took the number over. Chuckle. If you are a very serious fan you might well know all that but I didn't!
    Yep, I knew that, as any Holmesian worth their salt should, and I have seen pictures of the museum which is why I knew existed. I have every story ever written, all the anotations, every episode with Jeremy Brett (the most faithful and best shows ever made) as well as all the restored versions of the Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce movies.

    I get a great deal of fun from using the tenets of deductive reasoning on people I have just met. (Especially my students!) For example, I told the bus driver of a tour bus I was on in Boston recently, "Great job driving, Ms. Hawkins, but of course you must know this town well having grown up here and I hope your daughter has a wonderful school year at Harvard. You must be very proud." Then I stepped off the bus as she sat there flabbergasted.

    (Her bus driver's ticket showed her name, only a local would have as pronounced Bostonian accent as hers, and she had pinned a single picture of a young woman standing in front of the Harvard University sign. Since there was only one picture, and the woman was young, I deduced that she was most likely the woman's daughter and since she was not old enough to be post-graduate, I deduced that she would be having another year that would be starting soon...)

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