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Thread: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

  1. #21
    I think, therefore I post chonsigirl's Avatar
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    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    Gosh Tombstone, that was a great post. I'll take you along to my US History classes as a guest lecturer anytime!

  2. #22
    Scrat
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    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    Good post TMBS. I do find this to be inaccurate though when it comes to the kids and cannibalism.

    LENINGRAD. The 900 day siege of Russia's second largest city cost the lives of around one and a half million civilians and soldiers. Food was so scarce that thousands were dying each day from hunger, disease and cold. With temperatures reaching minus 40˚C, around 53,000 people died in the month of November. On Christmas Day, 1941, an estimated 3,700 inhabitants died from starvation. Many just collapsed in the street, their bodies soon covered by snow and their whereabouts not known until the spring thaw. Cannibalism was resorted to on a number of occasions the main victims being young boys and girls who were waylaid on the streets and murdered, in many cases by women driven to desperation to get food for their hungry children. In January, 1944, the Russian winter offensive pushed the surrounding German troops fifty miles back from the city's perimeter, allowing railway links with Moscow to reopen and relief supplies to reach the city. (Leningrad has now reverted to its pre-war name, St Petersburg).

    Of all the citizens in Leningrad the best cared for was the children, mothers and children were evacuated first, grandparents/parents gave their food to the kids at their own peril. During the summer of 1942 the Swedes took them out by the boatload under the flag of the Redcross. No one murdered young boys and girls and ate them, there were few mothers and children in the city in the fall of 1942. By 1943 it was a military city almost exclusively.

    Of the children that did die it was mostly from disease that at the time the Soviets were not able to fight at the time such as TB, dysentary and pneumonia. The conditions in which they lived and lack of medicine, not lack of food, took most of those who died. It is interesting to note that most of the children that the Russians thought to be dead or had down as missing showed up over the years as they grew up and became workers.

    Russians are totally devoted to their children, there is no compromising there. Many a soldier marching past and many a parent gave their last to a child.

  3. #23
    Scrat
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    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    You can add the supposedly true story about the German "88" crew in the Caucasus that got incredibly lucky when they took a shot at a T-34 at 7000 yards and got a direct hit.

    They were just playing around.

  4. #24
    randall randall's Avatar
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    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    'evening all, randall here,
    Well TOMBSTONE you certainly wrote an interesting TOME on interesting events that occurred during World War II.
    I am still reading it.
    I am a avid war fanatic having read almost all of Capt. Liddell Hart's books - (The Way To Win Wars for example) - Von Runsted replied proudly when he was asked where the idea of Blitzkreig came to him, "I am Captain Liddell Hart's disciple."
    This was emulated when the Americans got hold of Von Braun and he told them that all the foundations for rockets travel, [power calculations, direction control, etc. etc. ) came from your own man Dr Goddard - apparently his inquisitors had never even heard of Dr Goddard and now you have an air base named after him.
    A bit late me-thinks.
    As it says in the Bible " A prophet is not without honour except in his own country"
    One interesting fact I came across was that in WW I the German surface raider SS "EMDEN" who's captain had the audacity to steam right down the narrow channel between the Malaysian Peninsula and Penang and shell both sides - they are only a few hundred yards apart and was almost out of sight before any British gun could be loaded.
    However, after a fairly successful voyage attacking allied shipping he was eventually caught by the HMAS "SYDNEY".
    They had already destroyed wireless stations on nearby islands, without killing the occupants, incidentally, and the meeting apparently was almost accidental although the British had a large fleet looking for her.
    In those days it was usually the smoke from the funnels that gave them away as it can be seen even if the ship is far beyond the horizon. I know personally, to my own cost, how difficult it is to keep coal fired boilers from smoking at all.
    You'er lucky if you get an hour with only a slight haze coming from the funnels but once the watch is changed and the fires are cleaned out the new coal shovelled in produces a massive amount of smoke before it reaches the right temperature.
    The captain of the SS "EMDEN" tried to lure the HMAS "SYDNEY" within torpedo range but the captain would not take the bait. He kept circling out of range until he had received confirmation from ashore that he was circling the much hunted "Emden" whereupon he gave the crew the chance to surrender but they scuttled their ship rather than do that.
    In 1939 another surface raider named the "Emden" was sent out to the Indian Ocean and proceeded to wreak havoc amongst the cargo ships and once again, this time with the added advantage of RADAR another HMAS "SYDNEY"caught up with her.
    The true story of the battle that ensued is vague to say the least except that a fierce gun fight took place between them and the HMAS "SYDNEY" set the Emden on fire and eventually sank her whereupon her crew took to carley floats and lifeboats or life rafts.
    These men we the last to see the HMAS "SYDNEY" as she steamed away from them over the horizon burning fiercely and never to be heard of again.
    The German crew were later picked up and became prisoners of war to my knowledge.
    Perhaps I am assuming to much but "Surface Raiders" like the SS "EMDEN" - and the later MV "ADLER" of WW II were large cargo ships which were loaded with many types and calibres of guns.
    They were normally hidden but in such a way the their camoflage could be dropped almost instantly and the topsides (or gunnels) of the ships hinged to drop down also to allow the guns to fire in an instant. They were also fitted with torpedo tubes under their waterlines and so appeared normal cargo ships.
    Their disguises included frequent changes of colour of paint, changes the ship's name and port of registry, changes to their "company's" badge and the erection of flimsy but authentic looking extra funnels.
    Others like the "Graff Spee" were real and very powerful battleships.
    Put that in a book - two ships with the same names fighting each other in each war - no one would believe it.
    I personally saw the modern "Emden" in Bremerhaven but to my disappointment she is only a a motor torpedo boat or either fires some sort of projectiles from large long tubes on either side of the superstructure.
    Of course she might well have the firepower of an ancient battleship.
    I have been bombed and machine gunned by the German Luftwaffe but my fondest memory is walking down the road to the doctors holding my mother's hand, past my school, when a German bomber, a JU 88, flew up the street at right angles to ours and it was so low you could see the rivets - and the German rear gunner actually waved his hand to me - and I waved back.
    A few minutes later a couple of RAF Hurricanes flew over us after it so I doubt if it got back to its base in Stavanger in Norway which was only 250 miles from us.

    We used to sit on the grass sloping down to the beach watching the German aircraft bombing convoys of ships as they rounded Rattray Head and this usually ended in a dogfight as we had both RAF fighter stations and Naval Air Stations in the northeast of Scotland.
    One convoy we watched we did not actually know that I had an uncle on one of the oil tankers and his youngest son on the anther - and they did not know it either!
    I can well remember seeing a float plane turning cartwheels on the surface of the sea when it was shot down by the RAF.
    The Germans sent float planes behind their bombing raiders to pick up any of their airmen who had crashed into the sea on their way back to their bases. They also had buoys anchored all over the North Sea where downed airmen or seamen, when their ships were sunk, could try and reach. Once inside the large buoys with the doors shut they were sheltered from the weather and there was a small amount of food and water available too.
    It was just a mtter of luck whether a German float plane or E-boat came upon them first and took them home to Germany.
    Usually it was a British motor torpedo boat or RAF high speed rescue launches who found them and took them prisoners.
    Some of these float planes did have red crosses painted on them but still the British shot them down and the British Propaganda machine - probably the best in the world at the time - told us that it was all a ruse by the Germans to prevent us from firing on their fighting machines. They really carried bombs and mines.
    After the war and more recently a lot of what we were told during the war on our wireless sets has been turned 180 degrees as investigative reporters and the freedom of information act forced the government to own up to its own lies.
    They are still lying to us yet - the only difference is that we know it.
    The truth will out.
    God bless all
    randall

  5. #25
    ArnoldLayne
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    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    Randall , you are a gem !

  6. #26
    FAKE-OLOGIST BTS's Avatar
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    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    Did you know the 911 attacks were not the first attacks against the USA on our soil?

    Fugos: Japanese Balloon Bombs of WWII

    Offically; in the waning days of the Pacific War Japan tried a last ditch ploy to hit the United States with a terror weapon. That weapon was the Balloon Bomb. It was supposted to set fire to the West Coast and drop anti-personel bombs randomly on the U.S. In research after the war it was found that the Japanese built 15,000 of them but only launched 9,300. A little over 300 Balloon Bomb incedents occured in the U.S. and Canada. The only casualties were a woman and five kids in Bly, Oregon on a church picnic, who found and moved one. It expoded, killing them all. The Seattle Times story from 1945
    Is that all? In my own research into this backwater of the World War II, I have found a few things that don't fit the offical story...It also relates to a mystery that haunts us till today, but some don't want to know its' truth..
    A Little History

    The Japanese have been using balloons in war since the 1800s. At Port Arthur they were used for observation of troop movements. The Japanese air force come out of the balloon society and little is mentioned of it during the war.
    The Weapon

    When the US first heard about the balloon bombs the didn't believe it. After a few were found things changed. They were considered a threat and they outlined it well in an unpublished manual called BD-1. Even though balloons which dropped incendary or antipersonnel were found other uses were enumerated in order of importance.
    1. Bacteriological or chemical warfare or both.
    2. Transportation of incendiary and antipersonnel bombs.
    3. Experiments for unknown purposes.
    4. Psychological efforts to inspire terror and diversion of forces.
    5. Transportation of agents.
    6. Anti-aircraft devices.
    Were these threats real or were they just playing it safe? We know now from a book on Unit 731 that the BW possablity was real. Sanders (who went to Japan to interview Shiro Ishii (Unit 731s commander)) worked on finding all the Fugos that landed and looking for BW. Offically none was found. Sanders did help in the cover up of Japanese BW/CW after the war. Did Sanders cover up Japanese use of BW/CW in the war?
    The Fugo or Balloon Bomb offiically came in two types. Type A: made by the Imperial Army and Type B: made by the Navy. The Type B had a radio for telemetry, was made of rubberised silk and offically carried no weapons. Just a few were launched and there are records of a balloon being heard for about 1600 miles.
    The Type A: (pictured here) was made of mulberry paper and infalted with hydrogen. As a paper weapon it came under much ridicule by the US. Here are its' specifications:
    A sphere about 100 ft. in daimeter with a volume of 19,000 cubic ft. of Hydrogen
    Lifting capacity 800 lbs at sealevel and 400 lbs at 32,000 ft.
    Armament: 5 5 or 12 kg. Theremite bombs and 1 15 kg. High Explosive Anti-personnel bomb.
    Of the over 300 incidence recorded about the Fugos during the end of WWII (1944-1945) none caused stoppage of war related activity, except for one case where a balloon landed on a power line at Cold Creek in Washington state. It caused the first SCRAM in history, taking down the first reactor used to make plutonium. The reports of all balloon bombs were censored so as not to give anything away to Japan. Eventually, after six people were killed in Oregon, the story did come out. Over Washington at least 50 were seen on one day. In a oral history of Hanford at least 40 were seen over the reservation. Offically no forest fires or other damage ocurred. The Fugos were a joke.
    But were they?
    If you read the newspapers for the last 2 years of the war a number of things do come out that are hard to explain. But first we will look at how a Fugo is supposed to work.
    The balloon bombs were released from Japan in the winter months when the jet stream is the strongest. They popped up to altitude (20,000 to 40,000 ft.) and if they were lucky into the stream. They traveled along in an easterly direction crossing the Pacific at around 200 mph in the jet stream. In daytime they would ride at the maximum altitude but as time wore on they would sink. At night they would collect dew and become heavy. Below a set height the altimeter would cause a set of blow plugs (charges that released the ballast) to fire releasing the sand bag ballast. The lost of weight would cause the balloon to pop back up to altitude. This continued till all the sand bags were gone. The last ballast was the armament. Thermite bombs were armed and dropped in the last positions on the ring. Anti-personnel bombs were also used. After all the ballast was gone a picric acid block blew up destroying the gondola. A fuse was lit that was connected to a charge on the balloon itself. The hydrogen and air mixture burned the balloon envelope up as a large orange fireball.
    The Allies thought they were coming from Japan but were not sure. Using the USGS and Canadian scientist they were able to narrow it down.
    A USGS Mineralogist Dr. Clarence S. Ross studied samples from Balloons found at Holy Cross, Alaska and Glendo, Wyoming. He found that the samples were beach sand and the type of fossils pointed to Northern Japan. The most likely source being in the vicinity of Shiogama on the east coast for Honshu, eight miles northeast of Sendai. The next most likely site were the beaches just south of Ohara, about forty miles southeast of Tokyo-this was Ichinomirya, an actual site.
    The Canadians also looked at samples and found a slag content, which indicated a nearness of a blast furnace. The US and Canada shared info to find the sites.
    The actual official launch sites were:
    Otsu, Ibarki Prefecture
    Ichinomirya, Chiba Prefecture
    Nakoso, Fukushims Prefecture
    "If America Was A Tree, The Left Would Root For The Termites...Greg Gutfeld."

  7. #27
    FAKE-OLOGIST BTS's Avatar
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    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    Did you all know that Lindbergh was anti-war?
    Here is a speech he gave against the war 2 1/2 months before we were hit by Japan.........
    Thank God we did not listen to his spiel then.....Sounds JUST like it could be spewed today

    http://www.stelzriede.com/ms/mus/clnowar.mp3
    "If America Was A Tree, The Left Would Root For The Termites...Greg Gutfeld."

  8. #28
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    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    posted by BTS
    Did you all know that Lindbergh was anti-war?
    Here is a speech he gave against the war 2 1/2 months before we were hit by Japan.........
    Thank God we did not listen to his spiel then.....Sounds JUST like it could be spewed today

    http://www.charleslindbergh.com/americanfirst/index.asp

    Much of it could, the rhetoric changes little over the years. He wasn't alone, events at the time are never as black and white as they are portrayed after the event and are often stranger than any fiction. Have a look at who was giving money to the Nazi party, some of the names will surprise you.

    try this one

    http://www.traces.org/williamshirer.html

  9. #29
    Little did I know... Tombstone's Avatar
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    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    I had this article for a long time in Word format. There was never an author attached to it because it was sent to me as a World War II synopsis paper.

    I decided to Google some of the paragraphs and I think I've found the definitive source for this material - and this subject matter in general:

    George Duncan's Historical Facts on World War II

    Be sure to check out this website. It is absolutely awesome for all history buffs!

    http://members.iinet.net.au/~gduncan/index.html
    Please use the "contact us" button if you need to contact a ForumGarden admin.

  10. #30
    randall randall's Avatar
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    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

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    Hello All, randall here,
    Further to my earlier reply to little known facts of WW II I agree with the statement made by the writer who said the Vee sign was from the Battle of Agincourt as I was taught that at school BEFORE 1939.
    It apparently was used in many a medieval battle since when an archer was captured his two fingers that pulled back the bow string and held the arrow were always chopped off so he could not be used as an archer again.
    Training a Welsh Long Bow archer started almost in childhood to achieve the accuracy that was expected of them in their teens in the heat of battle.
    THAT said - their fingers were cut off if they were allowed to live as it was the archer job to go round the battlefield after the the battle was over to cut the throats of the injured - that did not make them popular even with their own side.
    They were considered a type of untermenschen.
    Further to my tale about the "Emden" and the "SYDNEY" I have recollected that my mother had a very large - about 12 inch 78 rpm gramophone record on one side of which was the Commonwealth troops embarking at some English port.
    I think it was of the ANZAC's embarking for Gallipoli with much affected jollity and on the other a song about the "EMDEN/SYDNEY saga of which I can only remember one short part of a line of the song
    "The Sydney appeared and the Germans said goodnight."
    Someone with the time and resources could maybe trace it back to its roots. Most of her 78's were DECCA, HMV or Parlaphone (?) I think. Another massive one sided one was the legendary Clara Butt singing in some great abbey in her wheelchair, "While sheep safely graze" or something like that. It was the world famous organ of the abbey that took her there to sing as only it could do justice to her massive voice.
    On the other side was simply a decorative design including the makers name.
    I used to lie beside the wooden "Regal" wind up gramophone entranced by these records but the motor spring kept breaking and I had to keep shortening it to repair it.
    God bless
    randall

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