Make these ads go away.
+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5
Results 41 to 50 of 50

Thread: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

  1. #41
    randall randall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    BUCHAN
    Posts
    292
    Local Date
    11-21-2019
    Local Time
    08:46 AM

    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    'morning all, randall here,
    Thanks a million Scrat & Co who told me about the Homer source of the quotation.
    Looking up my tiny, wee book "Collins Gem - Dictionary of Quotations" I could not find it but there are few of Homers writings in it but one did appeal to me.
    "As the generation of leaves, so is that of men (Illiad, 6"
    Georgina Christina Rossetti's poems have always appealed to me but many find her too doleful.
    One of her cheerier ones starts, "Christ came down at Christmas --- " and is sung in churches all over the world.
    The Buddist friends I have tell me that they have transcribed a lot of Christian hymns for their own use. "Oh for a thousand tongues to sing my Great Buddas' praise...." is an example.
    Why is it that people always want to look for and emphasise the difference rather than the similarity of faiths - especially the Abrahamic ones = Jew, Christians and Islam.
    God bless.
    randall

  2. #42
    randall randall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    BUCHAN
    Posts
    292
    Local Date
    11-21-2019
    Local Time
    08:46 AM

    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    [QUOTE=randall]'morning all, randall here,
    Thanks a million Scrat & Co who told me about the Homer source of the quotation.
    Looking up my tiny, wee book "Collins Gem - Dictionary of Quotations" I could not find it but there are few of Homers writings in it but one did appeal to me.
    "As the generation of leaves, so is that of men (Illiad, 6"
    Georgina Christina Rossetti's poems have always appealed to me but many find her too doleful.
    One of her cheerier ones starts, "Christ came down at Christmas --- " and is sung in churches all over the world.
    The Buddist friends I have tell me that they have transcribed a lot of Christian hymns for their own use. "Oh for a thousand tongues to sing my Great Buddas' praise...." is an example.
    Why is it that people always want to look for and emphasise the difference rather than the similarity of faiths - especially the Abrahamic ones = Jew, Christians and Islam.
    God bless.
    randall[
    "The more we know the more we undstand how little we know."/QUOTE]

  3. #43
    Little did I know... Tombstone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Idaho Panhandle
    Posts
    3,821
    Local Date
    11-21-2019
    Local Time
    12:46 AM

    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    Quote Originally Posted by BTS
    Did you know the 911 attacks were not the first attacks against the USA on our soil?

    Fugos: Japanese Balloon Bombs of WWII
    BTS, thanks for this post. Since I live in the Pacific NW/Inland NW - I have been fascinated by these balloons since many landed in my region. I just recently found an article from the EAST BENTON COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY - 205 Keewaydin Drive P.O. Box 6964 Kennewick, WA 99336-0602. A great first person article about this very subject:

    -----------------------------------------------
    When Duane Hamilton's family moved to the area in 1943, they didn't have an inkling of the excitement that would soon follow. Mr. Hamilton tells about his early memories:

    "In 1943, my family moved from a ridge-farm in the Missouri Ozarks to a wheat ranch in Horse Heaven Hills a few miles southeast of Hanford. I entered junior high in Kennewick. Across the river, the Pasco Naval Air Station trained combat pilots and air crews. "The Saints," a VC-27 Squadron that accounted for 68 Japanese aircraft destroyed, trained there.

    "Kennewick, Pasco, and environs were very aware of the Navy. Civilians worked on base and sailors worked part-time off base. Three worked regularly on their days off at the ranch where we lived. The sailors were young and felt very comfortable with civilians. An ensign from Louisiana was scoutmaster of a Kennewick Boy Scout troop and took us on a tour of the flight line. We were allowed to crawl through the radio operator's station up into the ball turret of a TBF Avenger torpedo plane. The scoutmaster was a F6F Hellcat pilot and started one for us. The shot-gun explosion and the puff of smoke that preceded the cranking of the engine was a thrilling demonstration.

    .

    Probably the most important secret on the base was the radar equipment in some of the planes. We saw the tiny TV-like antennas on the wings, but didn't know what they were. Our host said they were secret and that was enough. The censors airbrushed them from photos released to the public.

    "[There was] Nothing like the Navy openness at Hanford. We didn't know what was happening ‘up there.' The workers there had a totally different mind-set. The Hanford workers had high-paying jobs, low living expenses, and draft deferments. They could be fired for simply asking a question and signed an agreement not to talk to each other or their families about their work. A card they carried listed what they could talk about. The ‘culture of secrecy' was established.

    "One Spring day in 1945, my dad and I delivered a truckload of wheat to the Kennewick Grange. Navy fighters over Kennewick were usual, but that day was different. They were very high, circling, diving, and climbing almost directly overhead. Today it seems odd the people at the grange would know they were flying about a Japanese balloon bomb without some sort of air-raid warning. It wasn't [odd] then.

    What the Hamiltons didn't know was that the Japanese had launched a balloon bomb barrage on the North American continent. Their goal had not been to kill people but to start forest fires that would destroy property and divert manpower from the war effort.

    The balloons were launched from three sites on the island of Honshu, chosen because of nearby rail lines and favorable terrain. There was also less chance that malfunctioning balloons would damage Japanese property. Of more than 9,000 balloons launched, about 1,000 reached North America. Mr. Hamilton continues: After the war, I read in various magazines about Japanese balloon bombs. In Oregon one killed five people. An obscure article about Hanford mentioned a Japanese balloon bomb had struck a power line to Hanford. I experienced the great ‘aha!' and my memory was vindicated. I assumed it was the incident I saw--the Navy must have shot it down onto the power line.

    The balloon bomb Mr. Hamilton remembers came down on a power line somewhere between Bonneville Dam and Grand Coulee Dam. Elaborate safety measures had been taken to prevent accidents in the reactor piles, and uninterrupted cooling water was essential. When the power was interrupted by the balloon, the safety mechanisms were triggered. Since the systems had never been tested, this incident gave everyone confidence in its safety, although it took three days to get the piles back to full capacity. This was the only American plant shut down by enemy action during World War II.

    Years later, the balloon bombs were on Mr. Hamilton's mind again, when he went on a bus tour of Hanford in 1994.

    "A month or so later, I read of an exhibit in the Boise, Idaho Museum of History commemorating that state in World War II. The account described a map of Japanese balloon-bomb landings in the Northwest. For me it was a ‘must see.' I wanted to know about the bomb over Kennewick. I was shocked to find on the exhibit map a great number of landings, not just in eastern Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, but in Michigan, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Texas, central Mexico, eastern Canada, and Alaska. The map was from Silent Siege II, by the Webb Research Group, in Medford, Oregon. I was very excited and ordered its revision, Silent Siege III, a large volume listing 312 findings of Japanese balloon bombs.

    "According to Silent Siege III, the Hanford Patrol had been alerted in 1944 and had seen several balloon bombs over or near the site. There were four sighted near Hanford on March 10, 1945--a Saturday. One of those caused the three-day shutdown. It [the balloon] came down to the northwest, near Yakima. I lived to the southeast. The prevailing wind is from the southwest. In the Spring it is often directly from the south. So there was on way it could have been what I saw. One found near Ephrata had been shot down. It might or might not be the one I saw the Navy planes tracking. At least fifteen balloon bombs came down, passed near, or drifted over Hanford in 1944 and 1945.

    Other places in Washington that balloons were found include Spokane, Prosser, Asotin, Ephrata, Goldendale, Puyallup, Satus Pass, Toppenish, Cold Creek, Everett, Colville, Walla Walla, Wapato, and Moxee. The first balloon bomb was spotted by a Navy plane on 4/11/44 near San Pedro, California. They found a large piece of rubberized silk with a heavy undercarriage. The undercarriage had a small radio transmitter attached. There wasn't much concern until a second one was found two weeks later. The first balloon to land on the continent was discovered near Thermopolis, Wyoming on 12/6/44. This one event was printed in the papers, and the Japanese heard about it. It was enough to prove their idea successful. It also prodded government agencies to do something, and all agencies, even forest rangers, were ordered to report any balloon sightings. But the government didn't want to panic Americans, nor did it want the Japanese to know their bombs had actually reached the United States. So all newspapers and radio stations were asked not to release news of the balloons, and they all complied. Unfortunately because of the censorship, the public was unaware of the danger and the five people of which Mr. Hamilton speaks, died as a result. After that, the ban was lifted and Americans were warned of the danger.

    The military adopted several strategies to fight the bombs. They considered the most serious threat to be from incendiary devices, so the "Firefly Project" began. Airplanes and paratroopers were stationed at critical points to fight fires. The threat of bacteriological warfare was considered the next most serious threat, which initiated the "Lightning Project." This consisted of alerting the Department of Agriculture, health and agricultural officers, veterinarians, agricultural colleges, and even 4-H clubs to be on the lookout for any strange diseases in livestock or crops. Decontamination chemicals and sprays were shipped to strategic points in the western U.S. The Sunset Project focused on experimenting with recovered balloons to test how they could be detected by radar. Radar stations were set up along the Washington coast to try to detect incoming balloons while still over the ocean. The Japanese stopped using the bombs after April 1945, when American raids disrupted the supply of hydrogen, so the Sunset project never became operational.

    Thank you Mr. Hamilton for sharing your memories with our readers!

    FROM THE COURIER, January 1997
    Please use the "contact us" button if you need to contact a ForumGarden admin.

  4. #44
    Junior Member juanita_ghy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Guwahati,Assam
    Posts
    7
    Local Date
    11-21-2019
    Local Time
    01:16 PM

    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    Liked reading about those facts....i have to present a seminar on Geopolitics during the two World Wars tomorrow in class....and i got lots of tips from here...should say u thanx...:-) anyways i have a keen interest on the World War II as well and i must say some of the facts were enlightening to me....hope to hear more of those from u.

  5. #45
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    29
    Local Date
    11-20-2019
    Local Time
    11:46 PM

    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    that might be first book ever published in a forum.

    -------------------------------------------------------------
    www.thecampusforum.com

  6. #46
    Senior Member gordonartist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    434
    Local Date
    11-21-2019
    Local Time
    06:46 PM

    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    I've copied this out and will read carefully.

    It's a great post.

    Gordon.

  7. #47
    magenta flame
    Guest

    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    Tha's interesting I thought it was the middle finger (giving the bird) that was used by the french.

    what's also interesting (I havent read it all so I not sure that you mentioned it) that America was conemplating joining the germans side? It was only turned around when Britain cut all the german communications to American sources.

  8. #48
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1
    Local Date
    11-20-2019
    Local Time
    11:46 PM

    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    Quote Originally Posted by Tombstone View Post
    As far as I can tell, this work is the result of George Duncan who runs a great World War 2 Historical Fact Website.


    BRITAIN'S FIRST CIVILIAN CASUALTIES REMEMBERED. On April 30, 1940, anti-aircraft fire shot down a German Heinkel 111 bomber while on a mine laying sortie off the east coast of England. The bomber crashed on to a house in Upper Victoria Road in Clacton-on-Sea in Essex killing the occupants, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Gill. They became the first civilians, of more than 60,000 killed in England during the war.

    BRITAIN'S NEXT CASUALTY. The third civilian killed in an air raid on Britain was twenty seven year old James Isbister, during a German raid on Scapa Flow in the Orkney's on July 24, 1940.

    Hello,

    I joined this forum to comment on this quite incorrect "fact" on George's website.

    I am researching a book on all German air attacks on Scotland 1939-1945, and thanks to official Scottish Government records I have obtained, I can confirm that (despite what George says) that James Isbister of Orkney, was in fact the first British civilian death of World War Two on 16th March, 1940, and not Mr and Mrs Gill as he states.

    On the date of Isbister's death that he gives (24th July 1940) there was no raid on Scapa Flow at all - the only raid in Scotland on that day being on the Rolls-Royce aero engine factory at Hillington, Glasgow.

    I would therefore urge a wee bit of caution in using George's website as a source of accurate information . . . if he can get this fact wrong, how many others are wrong?

    Greetings from Scotland to you all.


  9. #49
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2
    Local Date
    11-20-2019
    Local Time
    11:46 PM

    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    Great job thanks

  10. #50
    Senior Member beowulf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Nottingham, U.K.
    Posts
    681
    Local Date
    11-21-2019
    Local Time
    08:46 AM

    Re: Little Known Facts Regarding World War 2

    Register to remove this ad.
    Quote Originally Posted by Freepokerstack View Post
    Great job thanks
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	holy thread resurrection.jpg
Views:	178150
Size:	67.2 KB
ID:	31565  
    The dogs philosophy on life. If you cant eat it, hump it or fight it,........ Pee on it and walk away!!

    (\/)
    (-_-)
    (")(")

+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5

Similar Threads

  1. Facts...........or are they........
    By Carolly in forum General Chit Chat
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 09-21-2008, 03:35 AM
  2. GEt the Facts
    By guppy in forum General Chit Chat
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-29-2007, 12:10 PM
  3. Facts about Sex
    By Sheryl in forum Just For The Fun Of It
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 02-02-2007, 03:33 PM
  4. Little Known Facts
    By Marie5656 in forum Did You Know?
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-13-2006, 12:04 PM
  5. Facts For Those Who Think:
    By Derryck in forum General Chit Chat
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 10-21-2005, 08:15 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts