Thats it England, all over.

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Saint_
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Post by Saint_ »

theia;1458414 wrote: Just heard that he has a 4 month ban from any football related activity


Well he can always go out for American Pro Wrestling....
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Post by Bruv »

Saint_;1458404 wrote: I have tried to watch soccer...really. But it has NO DRAMA! Who wants to watch the ball go back and forth for two hours?!! typical scores are like 1-0. Really? That's like watching the world's longest and most boring tennis match. Even golf has more scoring and drama.

Pfft. World cup. At least in American Football, the players get to hit each other.


First it is Football, soccer is a name Americans made up so they wouldn't get confused with the other game Americans call football, which has no relation to real Football.

I suspect the reason real football hasn't taken off in the US is because you have to play 45 minutes without a break for adverts, so needing a full 45 minute concentration in one loooooong spell.
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Post by Týr »

Saint_;1458404 wrote: I have tried to watch soccer...really. But it has NO DRAMA!
Quite what you'd think of a four-day county cricket match I dread to think.
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Post by Bruv »

Týr;1458420 wrote: Quite what you'd think of a four-day county cricket match I dread to think.


You wouldn't want to know what I think either.
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Post by G#Gill »

Oops
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Post by G#Gill »

Saint_;1458417 wrote: Well he can always go out for American Pro Wrestling....


Do they bite their opponents a lot, then, in American Pro Wrestling ? :yh_rotfl :lips: Just askin' :thinking: :-3
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Post by Saint_ »

G#Gill;1458468 wrote: Do they bite their opponents a lot, then, in American Pro Wrestling ? :yh_rotfl :lips: Just askin' :thinking: :-3


Oh yes, absolutely! Along with hitting them with chairs, strangling them with the ring ropes, and gouging eyes.
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Post by Oscar Namechange »

How patronising and condescending to Americans ! They do play cricket you know.

History of United States cricket - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Oscar Namechange;1458472 wrote: How patronising and condescending to Americans ! They do play cricket you know.

I will lay money with you on a bet, if you like. Call it £10 either way perhaps. That no four-day cricket match - we'll leave out the "county" since they have no county cricket structure, but I did specify four-day cricket - has been played on the soil of the United States in living memory.

CricInfo has all the statistics, I expect. By all means claim your winnings if I'm wrong. The nearest you might come to winning is the Hollywood English expatriate community in the 1930s but I don't think even David Niven could keep it up that long.

I was reacting to Saint's "I have tried to watch soccer...really. But it has NO DRAMA!" with a reference to the four-day version of cricket. The comparison was in dramatic value as perceived by Saint who can see no drama in soccer. Whether Americans play cricket or not is a total non-sequitur. You do seem to score a shockingly high number of those. The solution might be thinking before posting.
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Post by Oscar Namechange »

America Is and has been for some time heading toward more than one day cricket.

"Also, it has never before been possible to see top players in elevated competition for more than a handful of days in a season. Now, America’s best will be facing off throughout the spring, summer and even into the fall, when the top six squads will meet in Florida hoping to win the national championship."

ACF Launches American Cricket Champions League - ACF - The Home of American Cricket
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Post by Týr »

Perhaps you simply don't understand the concept of relevance.





eta, and having nothing to do with my initial comment in this post... I've just looked at your link. Not a single word in it suggests that "America Is and has been for some time heading toward more than one day cricket". Everything it discusses is one-day cricket. It uses the phrase "40-over cricket" - that's one-day limited-over cricket too, if you'd not worked it out. What do you see in your referenced article that even hints at the possible achievement some day of "more than one day cricket"? Do, please, quote the appropriate text in your reply - let's drop the vaguety.
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Post by Oscar Namechange »

More US channels are taking up broadcasting cricket these days. For anyone who questions what Americans would make of a four day test match Is to typicaly stero-type Americans as lacking the concentration and endurance to remain engaged for four days. Why wouldn't Americans make out four days of cricket?
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Post by Saint_ »

We have lots of crickets where I live. And they all live more than four days....

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Post by Týr »

Oscar Namechange;1458479 wrote: More US channels are taking up broadcasting cricket these days. For anyone who questions what Americans would make of a four day test match Is to typicaly stero-type Americans as lacking the concentration and endurance to remain engaged for four days. Why wouldn't Americans make out four days of cricket?


It's pointless trying to discuss with you, as usual. You consistently either fail to reed or fail to comprehend. I'll copy it, for emphasis...I was reacting to Saint's "I have tried to watch soccer...really. But it has NO DRAMA!" with a reference to the four-day version of cricket. The comparison was in dramatic value as perceived by Saint who can see no drama in soccer.

- as in, if you think soccer has no drama, you should see what you make of four-day cricket.
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Post by Saint_ »

Týr;1458481 wrote: - as in, if you think soccer has no drama, you should see what you make of four-day cricket.


Lol. I get it! And as to my mention of drama, the definitions, of course, are different. To Americans, scoring points is more dramatic than the playing, so we tend to like high schooling games better. (I.e. American Football, Baseball, and Basketball)
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Post by Oscar Namechange »

Týr;1458481 wrote: It's pointless trying to discuss with you, as usual. You consistently either fail to reed or fail to comprehend. I'll copy it, for emphasis...I was reacting to Saint's "I have tried to watch soccer...really. But it has NO DRAMA!" with a reference to the four-day version of cricket. The comparison was in dramatic value as perceived by Saint who can see no drama in soccer.

- as in, if you think soccer has no drama, you should see what you make of four-day cricket.
I think Saint was speaking figuratively and not literally.

Americans are just as capable as following four days of cricket as the rest of us. Not all Americans have to have BAM BOOM PAZAZZ In short periods to be entertained. They play chess also. Bobby Fischer did the US proud I recall.
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Post by Týr »

Oscar Namechange;1458483 wrote:

I think Saint was speaking figuratively and not literally.

Americans are just as capable as following four days of cricket as the rest of us.
Where does Saint's being an American come into my post!!!!!!!!!!

As for "figuratively and not literally" I'm not sure what you think either figuratively or literally mean. He says very explicitly "I have tried to watch soccer...really". How is that anything but a simple statement of literal fact? It even has a "really" in it. "But it has NO DRAMA!" - another simple statement of fact regarding his reaction to it. Where's the figurative???????????????
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Post by Snowfire »

Oscar Namechange;1458474 wrote: America Is and has been for some time heading toward more than one day cricket.

[/url]


Cricket may be becoming more popular but mostly it is played by expats from maybe UK, Australia and the Indian subcontinent with some Americans taking it up and then pretty much entirely limited over cricket (they would have far more success with the 20/20 format. You only have to look at the Indian Premiere League ). Its a million miles from either 4 day county cricket or 5 day test cricket. The fact is it wouldnt be popular in the US. It has to be in the blood and borne of a culture. It is the complete antithesis of American Football

There are only 10 nations which have Test cricket status. You cant just arbitrarily decide to play test cricket. Ireland have applied but it could be years before any white flannels * are pulled on in Dublin.

eta *Ireland playing County cricket notwithstanding
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Post by Týr »

Saint_;1458482 wrote: Lol. I get it! And as to my mention of drama, the definitions, of course, are different. To Americans, scoring points is more dramatic than the playing, so we tend to like high schooling games better. (I.e. American Football, Baseball, and Basketball)The odd thing is that in a typical four-day cricket match around 700 runs might be scored, thirty batsmen dismissed in a variety of obscure ways, the weather and passing pigeons observed minutely by people with many decades of experience and you can drink warm beer at the same time. Would you like to qualify "high-scoring" as a measure of excitement?
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Post by gmc »

posted by saint

I have tried to watch soccer...really. But it has NO DRAMA! Who wants to watch the ball go back and forth for two hours?!! typical scores are like 1-0. Really? That's like watching the world's longest and most boring tennis match. Even golf has more scoring and drama.

Pfft. World cup. At least in American Football, the players get to hit each other.


I've tried watching american football. Looks like rugby for wimps to me. All that armour try being tackled by a seventeen stone mal running at 12 miles an hour with no armour to protect you.

You play rounders as well don't you and have world series in it, I mean talk about seeing yourselves as th centre of the world.

posted by oscar namechange active member of the raving monster loon party.

I think Saint was speaking figuratively and not literally.

Americans are just as capable as following four days of cricket as the rest of us. Not all Americans have to have BAM BOOM PAZAZZ In short periods to be entertained. They play chess also. Bobby Fischer did the US proud I recall.


Come off it saint was just taking the piss as he is perfectly entitled, tyr is right about cricket that peculiarly british (actually it's nglish don't bring the scots and irich in to this) pasttime that is on a par with watching paint dry, I think it's a con they all watch it and no one wants to admit they are bored senseless.

Does anyone take this woman seriously in the US?

America's soccer interest is sign of country's 'moral decay' claims Ann Coulter | Mail Online
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Post by Oscar Namechange »

Posted by gmc, member of the deluded Scottish Independance Party;1458521 wrote:

Come off it saint was just taking the piss as he is perfectly entitled, tyr is right about cricket that peculiarly british (actually it's nglish don't bring the scots and irich in to this) pasttime that is on a par with watching paint dry, I think it's a con they all watch it and no one wants to admit they are bored senseless.

] I never argued that cricket was not particually British but I think you'll find It's typically more English. I argued that the US TV channels are showing more test cricket these days and there's every chance the average American can be engaged for 4 days.

Growing up, I suffered the most torturous child abuse known to man. Father was President of his cricket club for over 25 years. One of my brothers had trials for the under 21's for England. All the men In my family played for my Father's team and every damn Sunday, I was forced by blackmail to go along and cheer them on. Only you don't cheer, you politely appalud and mutter such as ' damn good show old boy'.

Mother did the tea's In the pavillion which was the only highlight.

My Father also arranged for visiting over-sea's teams to come down and play and we also had cricket tours that could last a fortnight, travelling around the country playing various teams. It was hell on earth and even during the winter when there was no cricket, I was used In the nets so my brother could practice his top spin. The better he got, the more my Mother kitted me out In protection. As I didn't wear a Turban, a crash helmet was used. But having said all that, I suppose I could at least sit through 4 days of test with the knowledge I subconciously picked up. Oh and one such tour, Colin Cowdrey came down to show the plebs how It was down. Harrogate If my memory serves me correctly but I just rmember a very nice man,
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Post by Týr »

Oscar Namechange;1458533 wrote: Growing up, I suffered the most torturous child abuse known to man.
There is hyperbole, and there is also repugnant bad taste. You would be well advised never to mix the two.
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Post by Peter Lake »

Týr;1458535 wrote: There is hyperbole, and there is also repugnant bad taste. You would be well advised never to mix the two. Groan. I would imagine knowing Oscar, it was very much tongue-in-cheek unlike the speed in which you follow her posts and given the fact she was replying to gmc.
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Post by G#Gill »

Týr;1458535 wrote: There is hyperbole, and there is also repugnant bad taste. You would be well advised never to mix the two.


I understand hyperbole in that post, but where is the 'repugnant bad taste' ? As far as I can see (read), Oscar, as a child, was 'forced' to attend various cricket matches which she found excruciatingly boring, and that action could be likened to child abuse (emotional maltreatment). I suspect that, as both Oscar's parents were involved with a particular cricket match, they could not leave Oscar at home so she had to attend the match and suffer the boredom despite her loathing of such an activity.
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Post by Peter Lake »

G#Gill;1458537 wrote: I understand hyperbole in that post, but where is the 'repugnant bad taste' ? As far as I can see (read), Oscar, as a child, was 'forced' to attend various cricket matches which she found excruciatingly boring, and that action could be likened to child abuse (emotional maltreatment). I suspect that, as both Oscar's parents were involved with a particular cricket match, they could not leave Oscar at home so she had to attend the match and suffer the boredom despite her loathing of such an activity. If we are speaking in the literal context, with being reliably informed that her brothers top spins could reach speeds in excess of 60 m.p.h by the time he was fourteen years old, i'd say standing in the nets as a small child while he practiced could be tantamount to a form of child abuse and her brother who's now a cricket coach, i'm sure would agree but we digress.
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Post by Týr »

Peter Lake;1458541 wrote: If we are speaking in the literal context, with being reliably informed that her brothers top spins could reach speeds in excess of 60 m.p.h by the time he was fourteen years old, i'd say standing in the nets as a small child while he practiced could be tantamount to a form of child abuse and her brother who's now a cricket coach, i'm sure would agree but we digress.


I'd call it digging the hole deeper. Or is diluting the term "child abuse" to trivial humour really amusing after all. I do hope it's not.

Nobody said anything about "tantamount to". I quoted what was actually written. "Growing up, I suffered the most torturous child abuse known to man."
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Post by Peter Lake »

Týr;1458546 wrote: I'd call it digging the hole deeper. Or is diluting the term "child abuse" to trivial humour really amusing after all. I do hope it's not.

Nobody said anything about "tantamount to". I quoted what was actually written. "Growing up, I suffered the most torturous child abuse known to man."


You've already turned a thread from football to cricket and now want to go off on another course on what constitutes child abuse. How about we have some respect for the author of the thread and adhere to the subject rather than troll what Oscar said or could it just be you're slightly miffed that as a mere woman, she may have a greater knowledge of cricket than you do? It all becomes rather tedious for all concerned unless of course, it's a deliberate ploy to entrap Oscar into a slanging match. I'd say a small child having a cricket ball hurled at her at 60 m.p.h repeatedly could constitute child abuse but it's solely in the eye of the beholder and not yours and that i'm afraid makes your argument ridiculous. It's in the eye of the beholder and if Oscar believes looking back it was humorous, then that remains her choice in life and not yours. For those reasons, i'll refrain from conversing with you further on the literal definition of child abuse and stick to the subject here.
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Post by Oscar Namechange »

Don't worry as revenge came swiftly. As I got older my practice of of sending a tennis serve down the T got faster. My Father also used the same brother as target parctice for that and one time, I got him straight between the eyes without a turban or crash helmet. :yh_rotfl
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Post by G#Gill »

Oscar Namechange;1458558 wrote: Don't worry as revenge came swiftly. As I got older my practice of of sending a tennis serve down the T got faster. My Father also used the same brother as target parctice for that and one time, I got him straight between the eyes without a turban or crash helmet. :yh_rotfl


Are you sure it was between the eyes ? :lips:
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Post by Týr »

Peter Lake;1458555 wrote: I'd say a small child having a cricket ball hurled at her at 60 m.p.h repeatedly could constitute child abuseNo doubt it could. What it can't possibly constitute is "the most torturous child abuse known to man". Words matter. I have no idea whether humour was intended but if so then I repeat, it's in repugnant bad taste.
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Post by Peter Lake »

G#Gill;1458563 wrote: Are you sure it was between the eyes ? :lips: He fathered children so i assume it was between the eyes.

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